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Thread: My new pet

  1. #9
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    Ozzy, you treated that situation exactly right. I love it! I did the same thing to my wife (maybe not the best idea) when she found a snake in the yard. I chased her around with it.

    Mind, this was a 5" long, 1/4" wide BABY GARDNER SNAKE, and she was afraid of it.

    (That would be GARTER Snake, Schloaty)



    17 Nash Rd.
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    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  2. #10

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    Though there are many black widow spiders in the world, the spiders here are no different, except for color. Baby black widows are not black, but white with little black spots and stripes. You wouldn't know it was a black widow without the help of an experienced collector. As they grow, the stripes and spots turn colors. Reds, yellows and white stripes all over the body. A small white hourglass = juvenile, white stripes, black spots.
    yellow hourglass = intermediate, white, yellow, and red stripes
    red/orange hourglass = predominately black spider, sometimes with remnants of intermediate colors of white, yellow and red, again in stripes. These colors usually disappear altogether as the spider matures, and sheds its exoskeleton. Only the red hourglass remains, usually.
    There are also RED widows, and many forms, such as the red back spider of Australia. All in the Latrodectus genus. The American Black Widow is Latrodectus mactans, with a few sub- species. It is incredible to watch the female make her egg case, and even more amazing to watch the babies being born.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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    Those are cool looking spiders. We don't have any of them up here. We get lots of barn spiders though...those things get pretty big.

    Bugweed....is there anything that you are not an expert in? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    The mind is like a parachute, it only works when it's open.

  4. #12

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    Firewired, I am not an expert, but I have researched and raised black widows. I read A LOT, and usually retain what I read pretty well. I am no expert, just well read.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  5. #13
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    But as long as the rest of us know nothing, you'll always seem like an expert. So you'll just have to get used to it. Like it or not.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  6. #14
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
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    You guys want to see a big spider? Look at this writing spider I found. It is about 4 to 5 inches long.


  7. #15

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    Wow......now that is a big spider. Where do those live?
    The mind is like a parachute, it only works when it's open.

  8. #16

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    It is known as the golden garden spider, an orb web weaver. Very pretty, and hell on garden insects. Mostly in the east. I did find one, and only one, in the Big Sky of Montana.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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