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Thread: International seed distribution from USA

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    RL7836's Avatar
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    Based on what I've read in the forums, omnisterra listserver, etc, I believe that restrictions on sending seed between countries are significantly more relaxed than sending plant material. However, I do seem to recall that some countries have some strict limitations on any plant material - including seed. I would appreciate either information or a possible website with information on restrictions between countries. Also, if anyone has had experiences - good or bad with sending seed, I'd like to hear about it.

    I plan to start distributing the D. paradoxa seed soon and I'd really like not to violate any major laws, get fined, etc. So far, the countries that may be involved include:
    - New Zealand
    - Australia
    - Canada
    - Czech Republic
    - Israel
    - Italy
    - France
    - Singapore
    - Mexico

    Thanks in advance for any information - I appreciate the help.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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    Admin- I'm growing CPs in the Desert of Tucson, Az. adnedarn's Avatar
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    Restrictions/Prohibitions per country you requested, Man I hope this answers your question!! LOL Sorry, I listed it all, you can read it and make your own decission [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
    - New Zealand
    Prohibitions

    Bank notes, coins, and other forms of currency are prohibited in all classes of mail, including registered letter-post items, insured parcels, and Express Mail International Service (EMS) shipments, that are sent to New Zealand.

    Radioactive materials.

    Restrictions

    Addressees are required to obtain import licenses from the New Zealand customs authorities for all shipments except the following:

    Bona fide gifts not exceeding 100 New Zealand dollars in value.

    Firearms require the addressee has police permission.

    Meat or meat products and fish and fish products are admitted only conditionally.

    Merchandise for the addressee's personal use, not for his or her business or professional use or for sale or trade, and not exceeding 20 New Zealand dollars in value.

    Used clothing and used bedding must be for personal use of persons in New Zealand, or with permission of the New Zealand Minister of Customs. Worn out clothing not for personal use must be clean and disinfected, or it will be done at the addressee's expense.
    - Australia
    Prohibitions

    Coins; bank notes; currency notes (paper money); securities of any kind payable to bearer; traveler's checks; platinum, gold, and silver (manufactured or not); precious stones; jewelry; and other valuable articles are prohibited.

    Fruit cartons (used or new).

    Goods bearing the name "Anzac."

    Goods produced wholly or partly in prisons or by convict labor.

    Perishable infectious biological substances.

    Radioactive materials.

    Registered philatelic articles with fictitious addresses.

    Seditious literature.

    Silencers for firearms.

    Used bedding.

    Restrictions

    Meat and other animal products; powdered or concentrated milk; and other dairy products requires permission to import from the Australian quarantine authorities.

    Permission of the Australian Director-General of Health is required to import medicines.
    - Canada
    Prohibitions (130)

    An issue of a publication in which more than 5 percent of its total advertising space is primarily directed to a Canadian market and which indicates:

    (a) specifically where goods or services may be obtained in Canada, or

    (b) specific items or conditions relating to the sale or provision of goods or services in Canada.

    All alcoholic beverages including wines, etc.

    An issue of a publication that contains an advertisement primarily directed to a Canadian market is a prohibited import if that advertisement does not appear in identical form in all editions of the issue distributed in the country of origin.

    Articles so marked as to create the false impression that they were made in Canada, Great Britain or any other British country.

    Butane gas lighters and refill cartridges.

    Commercial tags of metal.

    Firearms, including prohibited and restricted weapons, may not be mailed to Canadian addressees from outside Canada.

    Oleomargarine and other butter substitutes, including altered or renovated butter.

    Perishable infectious biological substances.

    Perishable noninfectious biological substances.

    Plumage and skins of wild birds.

    Prison-made goods being sold or intended for sale by a person or firm.

    Radioactive materials.

    Reprints of Canadian or British works copyrighted in Canada.

    Reproductions of Canadian postage stamps unless printed in publications in black and white only and with a defacing line drawn across each reproduction.

    Shipments bearing caution labels indicating the contents are flammable.

    Smoke-making devices for motor vehicles and boats.

    Used or secondhand hives or bee supplies.

    Restrictions

    Coins; banknotes; currency notes; securities payable to bearer; traveler's checks; gold, silver, platinum, manufactured or not; jewelry; and other valuable articles may be sent only in registered letter-post items.

    Exceptions:

    Coins sent to or from collectors or dealers may be mailed in ordinary (uninsured) parcel post packages.

    Drugs and medicines must comply with Canadian law.

    Eggs for hatching must be packed in new, clean containers and accompanied by a certificate issued by a veterinarian of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, or one issued by a State veterinarian and endorsed by a veterinarian of that Bureau, stating that to the best of his or her knowledge the eggs come from a flock that is free from Newcastle disease, fowl pest, or fowl typhoid. See 135.3 for method of packing.

    Meat and meat food products must be accompanied by an export certificate issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and labeled in accordance with Canadian regulations. Exception to these requirements are:

    (1) bona fide sample shipments weighing less than 10 kg;

    (2) meat products addressed to a government department or agency;

    (3) meat products intended for personal consumption when they enter Canada in the possession of the importer.

    Precious stones, set or not set; all items used as dress ornaments and coming under the term "jewelry" including articles of gold or other precious metal for personal use such as cigarette holders, cases, powder cases, card cases, opera glasses, fountain pens, watches, etc., are permitted in insured parcel post packages provided the articles have value not over $5 U.S. A parcel post package containing a number of such articles valued at $5 or less may be insured for the total value of the contents up to a maximum of $200.

    Senders are advised to communicate with prospective addressees to assure themselves before mailing that such articles will be admitted.

    Veterinary biological products including serums and vaccines must be accompanied by a permit issued by the Veterinary Director General, Ministry of Agriculture of Canada.
    - Czech Republic
    Prohibitions (130)

    Chain letter items.

    Perishable infectious substances.

    Perishable noninfectious substances.

    Publications, drawings, photographs, records, sheets of music, etc., contrary to the State public order.

    Radioactive materials.

    Restrictions

    Coins; paper money; securities and other paper values of any kind; as well as savings-bank booklets; and unmanufactured gold, silver, and platinum may be imported only by authorization of the State Bank.

    Gift shipments must be sent by private individuals. Those sent by commercial firms are not admitted.

    Import permits are required for gift shipments exceeding three per year for one addressee, or for any shipment exceeding 3,000 Czech Republic crowns in value. Permits may be issued to addressees or withheld at the discretion of the customs authorities after the shipment arrives.

    Medicines are admitted provided the addressee is in possession of an import permit granted by the Czech Republic health authorities.

    Philatelic articles and stamps exchanged between member philatelists must not exceed 1,000 Czech Republic crowns in any calendar year. Gift packages containing philatelic articles are restricted to 3 per year and the shipment cannot exceed a total of 100 stamps or philatelic articles and 100 Czech Republic crowns in value.
    - Israel
    Prohibitions (130)

    Agricultural tools and accessories.

    Bank and currency notes at present in circulation in Israel.

    Blank invoices with headings.

    Cigarettes exceeding 600.

    Dairy products, except for canned powdered milk.

    Fish and fish products, except for canned items.

    Fresh fruits and vegetables.

    Games of chance.

    Indecent or obscene marks, paintings, photographs, books, cards, lithographs, or engravings.

    Infectious perishable biological substances.

    Live plants and seeds.

    Lottery tickets and advertisements.

    Organic fertilizers.

    Radioactive materials.

    Soil and sand.

    Spices exceeding 1 kg.

    Tobacco, in various forms, exceeding 600 grams.

    Used beehives.

    Restrictions

    Coins; banknotes; currency notes (paper money); securities payable to bearer; traveler's checks; platinum, gold or silver, manufactured or not; precious stones; jewelry; and other valuable articles may only be sent in registered letter-post shipments.

    Import licenses are not required for bona fide gifts, namely, all articles for the recipients' personal use provided that the import of the articles is permitted or for immigrant's personal effects.

    Import licenses are required for many articles including radios, televisions and other transmitters; medical or scientific instruments; underwater equipment and cinematographic film; postal stamps exceeding 100 Israeli pounds; meat and meat products; and plants.

    Records, films, recording wire, computer cards, QSL cards, and magnetic film are admitted only if sent in letter-post shipments.

    Spices may be mailed in quantities not to exceed 0.5 kilograms (1.1 pounds) per spice. To import larger quantities from abroad, the prospective recipient must obtain an import license issued by the Israeli government.

    Vitamins, minerals, and food supplements may be mailed in quantities not to exceed 100 grams (3.5 ounces) or one package per product. To import larger quantities from abroad, the prospective recipient must obtain an import license issued by the Israeli government.

    Food products may be mailed in quantities not to exceed 3 kilograms (6.6 pounds) per food item or 15 kilograms (33 pounds) per total food shipment. To import larger quantities from abroad, the prospective recipient must obtain an import license issued by the Israeli government.

    Imports of fresh and frozen meats require both a permit issued by the Israeli Ministry of Agriculture and a certificate issued by the competent regulatory authority in the country of origin which attests to the fact that "veterinary control has been carried out."

    Imports of commercial samples of meat and fish products require either a permit issued by the Israeli Food Control Administration or a certificate issued by the competent regulatory authority in the country of origin which attests to the fact that the contents are "fit for human consumption."
    - Italy
    Prohibitions (130)

    Albums of any kind (of photographs, postcards, postage stamps, etc.).

    Arms and weapons.

    Articles of platinum or gold; jewelry; and other valuable articles unless sent as insured packages.

    Artificial flowers and fruits and accessories for them.

    Bells and other musical instruments and parts thereof.

    Cartridge caps; cartridges.

    Clocks and supplies for clocks.

    Compound medicaments and medicines.

    Coral mounted in any way.

    Ether and chloroform.

    Exposed photographic and cinematographic films.

    Footwear of any kind.

    Haberdashery and sewn articles of any kind, including trimmings and lace; handkerchiefs; scarves; shawls, needlework including stockings and gloves; bonnets, caps, and hats of any kind.

    Hair and articles made of hair.

    Human remains.

    Leather goods.

    Lighters and their parts, including lighter flints.

    Live bees, leeches, and silkworms.

    Live plants and animals.

    Nutmeg, vanilla; sea salt, rock salt; saffron.

    Parasites and predators of harmful insects.

    Perfumery goods of all kinds (except soap).

    Playing cards of any kind.

    Postage stamps in sealed or unsealed letter-post shipments.

    Radioactive materials.

    Ribbons for typewriters.

    Roasted or ground coffee and its substitutes; roasted chicory.

    Saccharine and all products containing saccharine.

    Salted, smoked or otherwise prepared meats; fats; and lard.

    Tobacco.

    Toys not made wholly of wood.

    Treated skins and furs.

    Weapons of any kind and spare parts for them.

    Restrictions

    Coins; bank notes; currency notes (paper money); traveler's checks; jewelry; and other precious or valuable articles must be enclosed in an insured parcel post package in order to be mailable to addressees in Italy.

    Postage stamps for philatelic purposes are admitted in registered letter-post shipments on condition that the package bears a completed Form 2976 and the addressee complies with the Italian financial regulations.
    - France
    (Includes Corsica and Monaco)

    Prohibitions (130)

    Arms, ammunition.

    Cigarette lighters using butane gas.

    Feeding bottles.

    Funeral urns.

    Goods bearing false marks of French manufacture or origin.

    Human remains.

    Imitation pearls containing lead salts and any articles of jewelry made with pearls of this type.

    Live plants and animals.

    Measuring instruments marked in units not complying with French law.

    Perishable infectious biological substances except as noted in Restrictions below.

    Perishable noninfectious biological substances except as noted under Restrictions below.

    Radioactive materials.

    Saccharine in tablets or packets.

    Restrictions

    Bees, honey, and beeswax must be accompanied by a certificate of origin and noninfection issued by a qualified official approved by the Government. Shipments of honey not exceeding 2 kilograms do not require the certificate.

    Books in the French language printed abroad must have the names of the publisher and printer shown as prescribed by the French copyright laws.

    Canned vegetables, fish, plums, and nuts not bearing an indication of the country of origin by stamping, in plain raised or sunken letters at least 4 millimeters high, in the middle of the top or bottom and in a place not bearing any inscription.

    Gold coins or other articles of gold require that the addressee have a permit issued by the Bank of France (not required for gold-plated articles or for ornaments or jewelry containing only small amounts of gold and weighing 500 grams or less).

    Medicines and medicinal products require an import license issued by the Central Pharmaceutical Service of the Ministry of Health.

    Perishable biological substances, infectious and noninfectious, are admitted when addressed to the following laboratories:

    1. Pasteur Institute
    25 rue du docteur Roux
    75724 Paris CEDEX 14
    FRANCE

    2. Pasteur Institute
    1 rue du Professeur Calmette
    59019 Lille CEDEX BB 245
    FRANCE

    3. Pasteur Institute
    77 rue Pasteur
    69365 Lyon CEDEX
    FRANCE

    Plants, seeds, bulbs must be accompanied by plant health certificate.

    The importation of tobacco leaves and stems, manufactured tobaccos, cigars, cigarettes, chewing and smoking tobacco is permitted only on behalf of the State Monopoly, with the following exception: Manufactured tobaccos, including cigars and cigarettes, may be sent to individuals in France for personal use up to 10 kilograms (22 pounds) per person per year, subject to special customs authorization.
    - Singapore
    Prohibitions (130)

    Advertisements for charms, amulets and talismans.

    Arms and firearms and parts thereof.

    Bullion of a value higher than $50 Singapore dollars

    Butane gas lighters and refills therefor.

    Coins except coins for purposes of ornament; banknotes; currency notes; traveler's checks; securities payable to bearer; precious stones; jewelry; and other valuable articles. However, unmounted precious stones may be sent in registered letter-post shipments if authorization is obtained from the Postmaster General of Singapore.

    Lotteries and advertisements concerning lotteries.

    Restrictions

    Meat or meat products including animal by-products require an import permit issued by Director of Primary Production, Singapore, and these articles must be addressed to the addressee care of the above Director.
    - Mexico
    Prohibitions (130)

    Ammunition, firing caps, and loaded metal cartridges for portable firearms.

    Coins; banknotes; currency notes (paper money); securities payable to bearer; traveler's checks; platinum, gold, or silver, manufactured or not; precious stones; jewelry; and other valuable articles.

    Meat and products derived from pork.

    Perishable confectionery, pastries, fruit, and vegetables.

    Perishable infectious biological substances.

    Perishable noninfectious biological substances.

    Pistols and other devices for emitting tear gas.

    Radioactive materials.

    Tickets, lists, and circulars for foreign lotteries.

    Works infringing copyrights covering Mexico.

    Restrictions

    Chocolate and products made of chocolate require prior authorization from the Mexican Secretary of Commerce.

    Medicinal products, beauty products, cosmetics, and toilet articles are admitted only by prior approval of the Department of Public Health in Mexico.
    -Andrew
    Owner of TerraForums, FlyTrapShop.com, and cpforums.org.
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    I'm not sure where that info came from but it is completely outdated, outright wrong in many cases and missing many current prohibitions regarding the Australian (and NZ) info. It wasn't from one of those postal services books was it?(a running joke in my line of work) It probably won't be terribly helpful as it doesn't mention live plant material or seeds anywhere.

    Try this website for relevant Australian info-

    http://www.aqis.gov.au/icon32/asp/ex_querycontent.asp

  4. #4
    Admin- I'm growing CPs in the Desert of Tucson, Az. adnedarn's Avatar
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    It was from the USPS website, yes. Not directly from an "outdated book" though



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    RL7836's Avatar
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    Thanks Andrew,
    This list was looking great till Sean came along and shot a hole though it... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]

    If I were to assume that this is mostly accurate (as accurate as our government ever is...). Some places call out plants and seed and others just live plant material - which is how I believe seeds are allowed in many places.

    What about this cure-all phrase:
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Perishable noninfectious biological substances.
    On the surface, this would seem to include seeds. Is there another more valid interpretation?

    Thanks again.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
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  6. #6

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    The problem with the USPS listing is that the information contained within is generally very old and is not updated. Obviously it is not something that is regularly checked to see if the info contained is relevant.

    I suspected I had seen a similar listing before- it occurred when I was working as a Quarantine Officer at the international mail centre here in Melbourne, Australia. We would often receive complaints from importers where we had seized goods. These importers assumed that they were doing the right thing as when they had requested info from US postal service they were provided with the same that was quoted by Andrew. The problem was that this info in many cases is outdated by at least 15 years- in relation to the Australian information this is the case.

    Always use the relevant agricultural authority of the appropriate country where the goods are being sent to ensure that the info you receive is current- ie USDA for the US, MAF for NZ or AQIS for Australia.

    Goods labelled as "Perishable noninfectious biological substances" would not include seeds or plant material but generally goods going to scientific or research institutes such as laboratories and universities. At least that is the way these goods are defined in Australia. These would include things like blood, serum, antibodies and other products for in-vitro use. Not sure how other countries would define this category of substance but I would assume that there may be some type of global convention used to categorize such products.

  7. #7
    Admin- I'm growing CPs in the Desert of Tucson, Az. adnedarn's Avatar
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    If it was wrong when you worked there, did you send corrected info to the USPS I wonder? Thanks for the correction by the way... How DARE me think info on the internet could be correct!!! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]



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  8. #8
    RL7836's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info guys. This is very good stuff.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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