User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 10

Thread: Need a new dormancy method this year.

  1. #1
    scottychaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western New York, USA
    Posts
    2,970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My Carnivorous plant collection is coming up on its 12th winter..
    As a bachelor, I had no problems storing my plants for the winter, because I had my own refridgerator! I could stuff it with plants.
    (see this thread for the background on my CP dormancy)
    http://www.terraforums.com/ib312....t=16597

    But now, as a married man, I no longer have that option!
    I was considering getting one of those small "college" fridges..the little cubes, but even those are $100..and too small anyway.

    I need a space that stays consistantly between 35 and 55 degrees, thats the goal.
    During the winter..November-February.
    Indoors is far too warm, outdoors is far too cold.

    So in our new house, there is a door from the basement leading into the backyard:



    (that isnt my actual door..its just a photo I found on-line to show the type of door I mean.)

    Up at ground level, the folding doors are metal, there is a concrete staircase of maybe 4-5 stairs leading down, then a heavy door that opens into the basement.

    At the bottom of those stairs, on the other side of the door from the basement, (in other words, at the bottom of the stairwell)
    with the door closed..What temp do you think would be maintained all winter?

    I could put some serious insulation above the plants, like maybe a piece of plywood halfway up the stairwell, then a heavy layer of leaves on top of that..sealing-in and insulating the lower level from the harsh winter above.



    Some heat would leak through the door..(although probably very little..its a hefty, well-insulated door)
    and outside its serious winter..lots of snow and temps anywhere from negative 10 to 30 F all winter..

    I could put a thermometer in there, and open the door (into the basement) once in awhile to check on things.

    my question is...does anyone have any idea what kind of temps could be expected in a space like that?
    would the frigid outdoor air make it REALLY cold?
    or would the fact thats its 5-6 feet underground make a more stable temp? If I could have 35-45, 55 tops, it would be perfect..

    thoughts?

    thanks,
    Scot

  2. #2
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I cannot answer your question about temps in that space - sorry.

    However - as an fyi, I overwinter my Sarrs (zone 6) in an unheated garage where they routinely freeze solid in Jan/Feb.

    My VFTs do not like these extreme temps so I overwinter them under lights in a basement room (that reaches low 40's in Jan/Feb)
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

  3. #3
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Olympia, Washington
    Posts
    4,064
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sounds like a good plan to me. You may be right about the air from outside being too cold, but if you cover the door with a plastic tarp and some mulch it should keep out drafts; make sure to keep an eye on the temps. I think you're probably right about insulating inside the stairwell, too. And if you can manage to pile a nice big snow drift on it, it should keep things at a very stable temperature.
    You can buy digital thermometers for about $12 with probes cabled to them to measure outdoor as well as indoor temperature; you could put the 'outdoor' sensor in with your plants and run the wire under the door. Then all you would have to do is adjust the temperature in the basement accordingly.
    Nice picture, too.
    Best luck,
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  4. #4
    Capslock's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,088
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Intuitively, this sounds like an excellent idea. But you'll have to verify the tempratures. Maybe drill a hole in the door if you need to?

    Casplock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  5. #5
    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    what if your just kept them outside and put on a bunch of pine needles(mulch)? thats what im going to do.
    Alex

    EDIT: i also live in Zone 6 (kentucky)
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  6. #6
    scottychaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western New York, USA
    Posts
    2,970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (glider14 @ Aug. 10 2006,12:57)]what if your just kept them outside and put on a bunch of pine needles(mulch)? thats what im going to do.
    Alex

    EDIT: i also live in Zone 6 (kentucky)
    Alex,
    some people in the northern US have had success overwintering southern Sarrs and VFTs in the ground..
    but I think they key is IN the ground..in a bog that is literally below ground level..
    that should provide good, stable temps that arent quite as cold as the air above..especially if heavy mulch is applied over the bog..

    But just talking a CP pot, out on a porch or deck, and covering it up with thick leaves or pine needles..wont work.
    (I tried it..they died.)

    If you take a mannequin, wrap it in layers of thick winter clothes and coats, stick it out in the middle of a field in North Dakota in January when the air is negative 30 degrees,
    the maniquin under all the thick clothes will be..
    negative 30 degrees..
    All the insulation in the world wont help if there isnt a big mass keeping the temp constant, (like the planet Earth)
    or some internal heat source..which pots of CPs dont have in the winter..

    so..from what I have read, CP dormancy *can* work up north, IF the plants are *in the ground* and heavily mulched..
    it *wont* work if they are just in pots above ground and mulched..its not the same thing..
    (unless your climate is warmer than Rochester..in which case it might work fine..I just know it wont work here..)

    Scot

  7. #7
    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Merced, California
    Posts
    1,503
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, untill winter gets here and you can take temp readings, any suggestion here is going to be a guess at best. I would suggest though that you postpone the annual haircut you give your plants untill you know for certain how cold it really gets. If you can't get it cold enough you will probably be better to leave the winter foliage on the plant and simply install a fluorescent fixture into the space to keep photosynthesis going.
    There are only 2 infinite things... the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not too sure about the universe.

  8. #8
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    LOL! Love the pictures.

    And being about an hour away from you, this winter I took my buckets of mini-bogs to the attic, as was, by the SW window, and placed them there from December through March. The only losses I sustained were two, very weak Lowes rescues of VFT's, which may have been dead beforehand.

    Everything else came back just fine, one by one. I had tow types of S. purpurea, Dana's Delight, alata, D. rotundifolia, two types of D. filiformis, D. intermedia, D. binata, a cobra lily, and an aquatic utrics.

    Things got cold, but not too cold to kill anything. As the photoperiod and temps increased, they all woke up, on their own. I jus watered them enough to make sure they didn't totally dry out. No fungicides were necessary. Very easy and incredibly successful approach.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •