User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 15

Thread: Venus flytrap-like creature found

  1. #1
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Greenswamp, NC
    Posts
    13,747
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Cracked rock found in county turns out to be fossilized find

    by JANET HEIM janeth@herald-mail.com

    HANCOCK - Harry Sloan knows the area around his home is filled with unique rock formations. Sloan lives two miles outside of Hancock, near the bottom of Sideling Hill.

    It still surprised him, though, when his 14-year-old son Adam accidentally dropped a rock - a speckled one that he found within 10 feet of their house - and found what looked like a fossilized remain of a small animal. At first look, Adam thought it was a fossil of a worm.

    The Sloans e-mailed a photo they took of the cracked rock to a professor at the University of Maryland in College Park

    Thomas Holtz Jr., a senior lecturer in vertebrate paleontology at the university, identified the fossil as that of a Crinostem, a small creature similar to a Venus flytrap, Sloan said. He added that Holtz said it was unusual to find a fossil of a Crinostem intact in the Hancock area, that most usually are embedded in rock.

    Sloan said he learned through Holtz that the valley near their home on Stein Road runs to Virginia, and 250 million years ago was a sea.

    Sloan said he would like to give the fossil to the Smithsonian Institution or to the Sideling Hill display so other people can enjoy it.

    "It's pretty neat to find something that old and to see it," Sloan said.
    http://www.herald-mail.com/?module....at=html




  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    427
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A what now? I think the article messed up the name, because I can't find squat on anything called a "crinostem". It sounds like they messed up the phrase "crinoid stem", referring to a group of echinoderms that look more like flowers than animals.

    Mokele
    \"With malleus aforethought, mammals got an earful of their ancestor's jaw.\"
    --J. Burns, on the evolution of auditory ossicles.

  3. #3
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Crinoid stem? Crinoids are very common fossils and I've been in a stream in Kentucky where the gravel bottom was almost entirely pieces of crinoid stem with the occasional "head". Even though fragments can be that common, complete fossils are pretty rare. See http://tolweb.org/Crinoidea. They're still around, but not with the same diversity as in the Paleozoic. And they're about as similar to a VFT as we are.

    Edit - I just noticed Mokele already solved it.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  4. #4
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mark.... it's only August. At least wait until March!

  5. #5
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Greenswamp, NC
    Posts
    13,747
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Don't worry, I've got a good one waiting for you. Too bad April don't come twice a year.

  6. #6
    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Crinoid stem? Crinoids are very common fossils and I've been in a stream in Kentucky where the gravel bottom was almost entirely pieces of crinoid stem with the occasional "head".
    ha yay kentucky! are these crinoids the same as brachiopods? we have tons of them here! ever heard of falls of the ohio? that place has more fossils than anywhere ive ever seen! me and my brother even found a rare trilobite(but it was small).
    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  7. #7
    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    z5/6, Rochester, NY
    Posts
    2,017
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Crinoids are related to sea anemones, I think. Brachiopods are clams and stuff.

    -Ben
    He who can, does. He who can't, teaches. -George Bernard Shaw
    I love these shirts!!!
    My Growlist
    My Webpage

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    427
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Glider: most of southwest Ohio rests on what's called the Cincinnati Arch, a huge crop of exposed limestone seabed from the Ordovician (440 mya, prior to vertebrates really taking over). As a result, in much of southwest OH you can find huge numbers of brachiopods, crinoids, bryozoans, and trilobites anywhere there's exposed rock.

    Technically, crinoids are closely related to neither clams nor sea anenomes, but rather to starfish. Essentially, they're an upside-down starfish with a long "stem" growing out of their back which anchors them to the substrate. They're distinct from anenomes and other cnidarians by virtue of being deutrostomes (the first hole in embryonic development becomes the anus, while in most other invertebrates it becomes the mouth), having 3 embryonic cell layers (cnirdarians have only 2), lacking nematocysts, having "tube feet", and possessing a 'skeleton' of calcium disks.

    Also, brachiopods aren't actually clams, but rather are lophoporates. I'll not go into *all* the details, but basically, a clam's plane of bilateral symmetry is between the two halves of the shell (in other words, if the opening of the clam is horizontal, what's on the left and right aren't the same, but what's on top and bottom are), while for brachiopods it's through the midline (the reverse: a bachipod with the opening oriented horizontally has the same stuff on left and right, but not top and bottom).

    Mokele
    \"With malleus aforethought, mammals got an earful of their ancestor's jaw.\"
    --J. Burns, on the evolution of auditory ossicles.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •