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Thread: What is your best method for studying?

  1. #9
    nepenthes_ak's Avatar
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    I don't study... if I did I'm sure I could pull all A B's right now I'm pretty much all across the board.. mostly C's and B's though. dunno what to tell you. I would say look at the stuff for 5 min's think about it for 3? I just remember theirs some pattern that helps you're mind remember it. Its something like that when i do study, its just been a while since I have really studied.

  2. #10
    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    mine started yesterday. i had english yesterday and had geometry and Church History(catholic high school) they were easy. im a sophomore in all honors classes so they can be difficult. tomarrow i have Chemistry(which is probably going to be the easiest!)
    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

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    quogue's Avatar
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    The best thing is to understand what you are studying. Route memory is worthless. When you read something, make sure you understand it before moving on then write it out to exercise what you just learned and you should be good to go.
    Spread your workload over a week instead of all in one night.
    Staying up all one night re-reading something over and over again while juicing up your body on stimulants is a crash & burn method.
    Being well-rested and understanding what you learned is possibly the best way to actually learn something in school instead of just passing tests...

  4. #12
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Yeah he's right. It's not healthy and prolly not good for long-term memory.

    Worked for me though. If you're just worried about getting an a and don't really care if you remember it (like spanish) that's what I did.

    Doing it the healthy way IS best, though.

  5. #13
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    For me, reading and writing are some of the best solo study tools. I typically take fairly messy notes in class, then around test time I take my at-school notebooks and, using my texts for reference, I compile a condensed set of notes with the information I'll need for the exams or whatever I'm gearing up for. My in-class notes are fairly impractical for studying, but I save all of my revised notebooks because usually they're as good as a Cliff's Notes guide or the textbook itself. Also, having a bunch of handwritten notes on all sorts of topics gives me a big jump on open-note tests.
    Another good method of studying is teaching. If you understand something well enough to teach it to someone else, chances are you know it. I try to find friends who are working on things that I'm studying or have already studied, and we discuss what we've learned, our setbacks, etc., or I'll tutor them in the skills that I'm trying to learn for myself. The act of explaining something requires the same type of thought processes you need to cogently answer questions, so it's really perfect practice for test-taking and public speaking. Along a similar vein, composing and practicing short speeches on the topics in question is another effective study method.
    I think I would have to recommend against caffiene before your test. I know some people swear by caffiene, and I use to as well (before my ulcer at age 12,) but caffiene and other stimulants ultimately hamper your ability to concentrate and focus, and it also drives your metabolism up the wall, so eventually you'll crash if you don't keep up a steady dose. Certainly, don't overload on caffiene - a little might not totally hype you up, but you'll last longer if you use it sparingly. Better to focus on nutrition a few days in advance, and naturally condition your body, than to force things in the short term. Eat plenty of protien and complex carbohydrates, and make sure to get vitamins and amino acids. Salmon is a particularly good protien for studies, because it's lean and has a whole load of fatty acids and other nutrients that enhance brain function. Go for dark carbs for a few days before the test as well - brown or wild rice, whole-grain baked goods, sweet potatoes, etc. These types of foods contain carbohydrates that take longer to digest, which gives your body a more steady supply of sugar; sugar, in turn, is what provides your brain and the rest of your body with chemical energy. Avoid things like white bread, white rice, bleached flour, potatoes and other processed or simple starches. It sounds simplistic, but white carbohydrates are the ones to look out for. These types of carbs are simpler and break down much faster in your body, leading to sudden spikes and drops in your blood sugar level, which will wreak havoc on brain function. Minerals, as from green vegetables and vitamin supplements, are also important. Eat a nutritious, modestly sized breakfast on the day of the test, too - don't pig out, because that will put you to sleep, but be sure that your body isn't just running on fumes.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  6. #14
    quogue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (seedjar @ Dec. 13 2006,3:59)]I think I would have to recommend against caffiene before your test. I know some people swear by caffiene, and I use to as well (before my ulcer at age 12,) but caffiene and other stimulants ultimately hamper your ability to concentrate and focus, and it also drives your metabolism up the wall, so eventually you'll crash if you don't keep up a steady dose. Certainly, don't overload on caffiene - a little might not totally hype you up, but you'll last longer if you use it sparingly. Better to focus on nutrition a few days in advance, and naturally condition your body, than to force things in the short term. Eat plenty of protien and complex carbohydrates, and make sure to get vitamins and amino acids. Salmon is a particularly good protien for studies, because it's lean and has a whole load of fatty acids and other nutrients that enhance brain function. Go for dark carbs for a few days before the test as well - brown or wild rice, whole-grain baked goods, sweet potatoes, etc. These types of foods contain carbohydrates that take longer to digest, which gives your body a more steady supply of sugar; sugar, in turn, is what provides your brain and the rest of your body with chemical energy. Avoid things like white bread, white rice, bleached flour, potatoes and other processed or simple starches. It sounds simplistic, but white carbohydrates are the ones to look out for. These types of carbs are simpler and break down much faster in your body, leading to sudden spikes and drops in your blood sugar level, which will wreak havoc on brain function. Minerals, as from green vegetables and vitamin supplements, are also important. Eat a nutritious, modestly sized breakfast on the day of the test, too - don't pig out, because that will put you to sleep, but be sure that your body isn't just running on fumes.
    ~Joe
    As someone who has Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) I couldn't agree with you more. I have witnessed first-hand throughout my life what you have expressed and can say that it is indeed the truth. I find it much easier to concentrate and think clearly and consistantly when I control my blood sugar levels by eating correctly and avoiding Caffeine highs and the subsequent lows.
    Well said Seedjar!

  7. #15
    wicked good plants! Presto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (joossa @ Dec. 13 2006,12:45)]There is no doubt that my Biology Lab course is causing me the most stress. It consists of taxonomy attributes of all major phyla in each domain and the morphology of specific organisms we have studied/dissected in lab (from methanogens to flowering plants).
    for my lab practicals, especially Human Anatomy and Invertebrate Zoology, I found it VERY helpful to make flash cards. on one side I would do a sketch of the organism/body area (it doesn't need to be a great picture, just good enough for you to know what it is), and a red arrow pointing to the part that I needed to identify. (or, several arrows with numbers.) and on the other side write the name(s) of the part. you could also do things like taxonomic names on one side, and common names on the other side. this was useful in two ways...by making me able to verbally identify parts by sight, or by making sure I can visually identify something based on its name. they take a little while to make - set aside several hours and do a good job. but by the end, you'll already have a lot of the material down, and studying the rest will be a breeze. it really works...I'm AWFUL at names, and I still managed to do pretty well on these tests!
    -Emily

  8. #16
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    One thing I nearly forgot is the importance of exercise and taking breaks when studying. The average adult has an attention span of about 25 minutes, if I remember correctly. When you're studying and you begin to lose your focus, switch gears and do something else breifly. The ideal thing would be to change to a different subject and continue to study, but you can also do something less productive for a few minutes, so long as you can bring yourself to return to your studies afterwards. I like to practice on my guitar or saxophone while I'm studying or doing homework - it keeps my mind active and is a good way to stretch my hands, as they tend to cramp up when I write or type. Physical and mental exercise are also very important to cognitive function. Most people find that they have a much easier time learning, focusing and working when their everyday routines include a moderate amount of physical exercise and mental stimulus. The human body is built to do a lot of different things each day, not the same thing over and over. So, avoid putting yourself in a situation where you must study non-stop for days on end, as ultimately it's a less efficient use of your time.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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