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Thread: contracting Sporotrichosis

  1. #17
    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    Are there any reports or studies that indicate if any brands of peat/LFS or any collection/cultivation sites have an increased rate or increased tendancy of the fungus contamination?


    I guess this is how our protocol must be when top dressing our CP's with LFS from now on...

    -Joel from Southern California


  2. #18
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    From the article I referenced previously:
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Epidemiology

    The dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii is found worldwide. The environmental niches for the organism include sphagnum moss, decaying vegetation, hay, and soil. Infection is seen most often in persons whose vocation or avocation brings them into contact with the environment. Landscaping, rose gardening, Christmas tree farming, topiary production, baling hay, and motor vehicle accidents have all been associated with sporotrichosis.56,57 Less commonly, pulmonary sporotrichosis results from inhalation of S. schenckii conidia from soil. Cases of sporotrichosis usually occur sporadically, but outbreaks have been described. The largest outbreak in the United States involved 84 patients in 25 states and was traced back to conifer seedlings that had been packed in sphagnum moss from Wisconsin.56

    S. schenckii can also be acquired through exposure to animals that are either infected or are able to passively transfer the organism from soil through scratching or biting. A variety of animals have been reported to transmit sporotrichosis, but cats with ulcerated skin lesions appear to be the most infectious. Clusters of sporotrichosis involving families and veterinarians caring for infected cats have been described.58,59
    I read somewhere that it's only dry sphagnum (and peat) that seems to be a problem. I guess the wet or the acid from the sphagnum/peat kills the spores eventually.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  3. #19
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (flytraplady5 @ Dec. 28 2006,11:05)]I'm sorry but the 2 photos used in that article look like some of the "Creatures Who Crawled Out Of the Swamp" in other words not real.
    Lois
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  4. #20
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    The infection comes from handling the LFS from what I have read. The one site I found on it when I researched it previously said the spores are not found in the peat. Just in the growing layers which is the LFS.

    After looking at this stuff I think that is what I contracted on my hands and elbows. It itches like the devil and you get little small blisters with clear fluid in them. I cannot say for sure that is what I have because it is clearing up with betta methazone cream and I am down to a few little spots on my hands and elbows. Thank goodness it did not go to the lymph system. If it was that. I didn't think of it when I went to the doctor to get it looked at, but I should have asked him fo a fungal culture. The big promary leason cleared up nicely, but there are other little spots that have persisted because I am not in the habit of putting on the bettamethazon cream like I should.
    JB
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  5. #21
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    This bag of LFS I bought says "Always wear protective gloves and wash your hands after handling soil, plants and moss."
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  6. #22
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Did they contract it from handling sphagnum peat though?
    yes
    that makes no logic

  7. #23
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Well, it can't be too awful easy to contract. I've been handling LFS for more than 35 years, even, sometimes, with many small cuts on my hands and arms. I haven't been infected yet. But I've always been mindful of any symptoms that might indicate the beginnings of an infection.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  8. #24

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    Excerpt from the Journal of Veterinary Medicine Assoc.

    Results of a study of sporotrichosis in humans indicate that forestry workers accounted for 17%, gardeners and florists for 10%, and other occupations associated with soil (such as farmers) for 16% of all infections with S schenckii. Human infections with S schenckii have occurred primarily after handling plant material; in 1983, for example, 12 cases of cutaneous sporotrichosis were reported among hay-mulching workers in Oklahoma and New Mexico.3 The most extensive outbreak of horticulture-related sporotrichosis occurred in 1988, in which 84 workers acquired cutaneous sporotrichosis after handling conifer seedlings that were packed in Pennsylvania with sphagnum moss that had been harvested in Wisconsin.4,5 In that outbreak, people in 15 states were affected, including forestry workers, garden-club members, and nursery workers. Sphagnum moss was also identified by investigators with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the source of sporotrichosis in 10 horticultural workers in a Disney World topiary.6

    Kirk Martin
    Fitchburg Mass.

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