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Thread: Winterizing outdoor plants

  1. #9
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I'm not sure if Wildbill's topic on outdoor mulching (Connecticut) is sill around, but you can trying sending him a PM about how he does it.

    As suggested by Ron Lane, a garage is another alternative. I have also successfully wintered temperate sundews / VFT's / Sarracenias in minibog buckets, placed as is, at a southern window sill, in the attic, here in Western NY. It gets cold, but doesn't kill them. And the sun cues the plants to waking up, amid the fluctuating temps.

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    I use 1'+ of pin oak leaves, which stay light & airy all winter. Maple and similar leaves mat down and try to suffocate anything underneath. I've learned to keep snow off the leaves and to water if there's a dry spell in the early spring. Other than for those two issues, I've never lost a single plant under the leaves.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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    I think I've decided to go with Pine needles for the winter. I'll probably go out this coming weekend to pick up the mesh and try to find the needles themselves.

    When should I actually put them to sleep for the winter? Is there anything I need to do before putting the mesh down (like cut off the leaves/pitchers)? Should I try to suspect the mesh a bit above the plants or just lay it overtop?

    Thanks.

  4. #12
    Metal King
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    you shouldn't have to suspend it. Cutting a lot of the pitchers off is a good idea, less chance of any kind of rot or anything, but leave (no pun intended, serious) the phyllodia on there at least

    I usually wait til late november to put it on, but that's cos my area is moderated by Lake Ontario, so basically as soon as night temps are getting a touch below zero and staying there, it's time to mulch

    Pine needles are easy to find, just locate some pine trees and there's usually hordes of brown needles around the base (better to find "wild" trees for 2 reasons- they will not be cleaned up before you get them like they are in many parks, and there's NO chance of weird chemicals being accidentally sprayed on them- like grass fertilizer, pesticides, herbicides etc)

    Hope this helps!!
    Da Growlist

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  5. #13
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Yeah... you've got until November, or at least when the weather forecast indicates overnight lows that will be consistently be below freezing. Cut off all dead foliage, but leave the greenery.

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    Looks like I have a little while then; thanks.

    When I chop the pitchers should I leave them laying in the garden hoping for some new plantlets in the spring, or would there be no chance of propogation via leaf cuttings?

  7. #15
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Sorry, you have to make rhizome cuttings from Sarracenia. Those old pitchers would rot and could encourage fungi since they are filled with bugs.

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    Amazingly last year all my plants were fine without protection and i live in zone 6.

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