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Thread: New Hottest Pepper

  1. #25
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    I'll admit Schloaty, that's hot to this wimp lmao. I'm no on your level and am humbled by your daring! My mom grew habaneros once, and my dad ate one in the middle of the night thinking it was just a banana pepper, so he popped the whole thing in his mouth and ate it. Then he rubbed his eyes lmao. He thought he needed to go to the hospital lmao (for real real, I'm not joking!)

  2. #26
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    SOUP dish? More like chili = whatever meet you have around, some beer, and a couple tomatos.
    Oh sorry...I just grabbed some words to use to distinquish the food from the plant. Here: Chili = "ground beef and chile peppers or chile powder often with tomatoes and kidney beans." That's not to say you can't make chile with other ingredients.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  3. #27
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    I was under the impression that all hot peppers originated in Central American and were then spread to other parts of the world. Does anyone know if that is correct?
    Your absolutely right, even though this pepper's botanical name is Capsicum chinense, it is "a complete misnomer, as this Chile variety has absolutely nothing to do with China" - the plant was mistaken to have come from asia. Just like our common milkweed was mistaken as coming from Syria (Asclepias syriaca). However that area of the world uses the most Capsicum (sp) in more of its food than almost anywhere else, so there is a lot of selection pressure for new types there- they are obviously capable of creating new varieties to suit local tastes.
    that makes no logic

  4. #28

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    Texans know that beans have no place in chili
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
    ^^^Newest vid

  5. #29
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    Ha. It's not chili without the beans.

    PAK, why don't you just say

    Chili = the dish you eat
    Chilie = the pepper.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  6. #30
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Chili = the dish you eat
    I don't eat my dishes. I used them to serve my chili.

    When I make chili, I'm rather light on the beans. I don't like really beanie chili.

    I DO like navy beans with ketchup on 'em. Yum!
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  7. #31

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    I grew alot of thai chili my brother took some then ate them,
    he screamed for hours not my fault
    I had a ton of pepers mostly jalepenos some plants were very hot while some were very mild,I usualy make salsa with onions,tomatoe,salt,jalepenos,cilantro and some other stuff very chunky salsa. In hawaii I had a ton of thai chilies there was this chinese guy who used to use my chilies(hot thai) on his salads in large amount as a salad topping the same ones that made my brothers scream for hours. Next year I wanna grow a large variety of hot pepers not atomic but warm and flavorfull for salsa.
    Peppers and tomatoes grew very well in hawaii thuse they were easy for me.

  8. #32
    Lauderdale's Avatar
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    Thanks for answering my question Finch. I did a little research and found the following:

    The Origins of Chile Peppers
    By Eric Vinje, Cosmic Chile

    Christopher Columbus didn't just sail the ocean blue and discover the New World in 1492 while trying to find a short cut to the East Indies. He sampled a plant, thought it was a relative of the black pepper, and dubbed it a "pepper."

    So began several hundred years of misinformation about chile peppers. Unlike what Christopher Columbus thought, they aren't related to black pepper and they didn't originate in India.

    Hot chile peppers actually came from somewhere in South America. There they were known as Aji (technically there should an accent over the "I" leaning towards the right). Chile peppers, which hail from the genus Capsicum are not related to black pepper. Instead they are members of the nightshade (Solanaceae) family and are related to tomatoes, cherries and eggplant.

    "Well into the 19th century, most Europeans continued to believe that peppers were native to India and the Orient, until Alphonse de Candolle, a botanist, produced convincing linguistic evidence for the South America origin of the genus Capsicum," states MSN.com's Foodies Corner.

    Whether you call them aji or chile peppers, these plants were likely first cultivated as early as 5000 BC. By 1492, Native Americans had domesticated at least four species. In the West Indies, Columbus found several different capsicums cultivated by the Arawak Indians.

    Columbus might not have been right about the origins, but he did help popularize chile peppers. (A chile by any other name will be just as hot, right?) He brought back samples to the Iberian Peninsula and they quickly spread about the world. And if you think that today's hot sauce explosion is amazing, check this out. According to the Foodies Corner of MSN.com, roughly 50 years after Columbus brought home peppers, they were being cultivated on all coasts of Africa, India, Asia, China, the Middle East, the Balkans, Central Europe and Italy. Peppers spread faster than kudzu.

    And although Columbus brought peppers to Spain, it was the Portugese traders who actually spread their use and cultivate, according to the Foodies Corner. Portuguese trading partners in turn spread peppers to Asia and the Arab world by the early 1500s. The Turks reportedly brought the chile pepper to Hungary in the mid-15th century.

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