User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 33

Thread: New Hottest Pepper

  1. #1
    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    New Hottest Pepper

    (Oct. 26) - It's hot. Scorching hot. Guinness World Records hot.

    Researchers at New Mexico State University have discovered the world’s hottest chili pepper. It's called the Bhut Jolokia, a variety originating in Assam, India.

    In tests that yield Scoville heat units (SHUs), the Bhut Jolokia reached 1 million SHUs, almost double the SHUs of former hotshot Red Savina (a type of habanero pepper), which measured a mere 577,000. The result was announced today by the American Society for Horticultural Science.

    Chili is spelled "chile" by some, including Paul Bosland, director of the Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State’s Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences. Bosland collected seeds of Bhut Jolokia while visiting India in 2001. He grew the plants for three years to produce enough seeds to complete the field tests.

    "The name Bhut Jolokia translates as 'ghost chile,'" Bosland explained. "I think it’s because the chile is so hot, you give up the ghost when you eat it!"

    The intense heat concentration of Bhut Jolokia could have a significant impact on the food industry as an economical seasoning in packaged foods, he said.

    2007-10-27 22:11:16
    http://news.aol.com/story/_a/hottest...00010000000001

    nice. cant wait to try one of these babies.
    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  2. #2
    nepenthes_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Spring Feild Ohio
    Posts
    3,116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OH god I couldnt even begin to imagine. Ill grow some dry some and send them to my Grandmother on my dads side (shes Hispanic loves REALLY spicy food)

  3. #3
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,806
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    when I was in india I have tried various kinds of chilli when we used to go for trips with my parents. I haven't been to assam but I do know that north indian chillies have quite a bit of kick to them.

  4. #4
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Greenswamp, NC
    Posts
    13,747
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow, I can't wait to get this one in my eyes.


  5. #5
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There was an article on this a few months ago in the LA Times. The Indian Army weapons research was studying this pepper and Bosland in New Mexico had heard about it from a former Indian soldier. I wouldn't consider Bosland the discoverer of this pepper if that is the case.

    If it was being studied for weapons research that speaks much for the lethality of this sucker. Sample at your own risk.

  6. #6
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    3,472
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    New?

    ...

    this was discovered in 2000.
    In August 2000, Indian scientists reported on a new chile cultivar grown in the hills near the Central Assamese town of Tezpur which they identified as Capsicum frutescens cv. Nagahari. This chile variety has been dubbed Tezpur chili, and is also sometimes errorneously referred to as Indian PC-1. Allegedly, the native name is naga jolokia [নাগা জলকীয়া] “chile of the Nagas” (the Nagas are a people inhabiting the border region between India and Burma, east of Tezpur; the reference might be the fiercy aggressive temper of the Nagas as perceived by the Indiens rather than an introduction of the chile from the Nagas to the Assamese-speaking Indians).

    This new chile type is reported much hotter than the Red Savina Habanero: Its heat was measured to incredible 855000 Scoville units, corresponding to 5.7% of capsaicin in the dried material (4.3% Capsaicin and 1.4% Dihydrocapsaicin; remarkably, other capsaicinoids are missing). There are plans to use this plant in the production of weapons (“pepper spray”) for private (anti-mugger defence) and for military (riot control) purposes. It is, however, not stated whether the value cited is typical for the variety, or just a rare exception. (Current Science, 79, 287, 2000; online [PDF])
    some more info on the plant
    Assam region indeed boasts a superhot chinense chile that was previously unknown to the world. Since the pods have an elongated (yet broad-shouldered) shape deviant from the typical lantern shape, it appears that the original scientists misidentified the botanical species. There are, however, other chinense cultivars with similar pods, like the fatalii or the datil.

    Seed material from Assam has been grown by a number of scientists and enthusiasts alike, and the fruits have throughout be proved extremely hot, ranging around one Megascoville. A couple of more names for this chile type have surfaced, like bih jolokia [বিহ জলকীয়া] “poison chile”, bhut jolokia [ভুত জলকীয়া] “ghost chile” or naga morich [নাগা মরিচ], which is just a translation of naga jolokia into Bengali. It is not known to me whether these names are traditional or quickly coined to satisfy the excessive Western demand for this chile. I have also read about a supposed name raja mirchi “chile king”, which appears to be Hindi [perhaps राजा मिरची] and thus can hardly be native to Assam.
    that makes no logic

  7. #7
    rattler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    missing, presumed dead
    Posts
    8,554
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If it was being studied for weapons research that speaks much for the lethality of this sucker. Sample at your own risk.
    lethal? only if your allergic..........its being looked at as a non-lethal weapon to intensify the effects of MACE and similar products.......bear defense sprays and the like........
    cervid serial killer
    Know guns, know peace, know safety. No guns, no peace, no safety
    I didn't get stimulated but he kept his promise on change, that's about all I got left!
    http://www.wolfpointherald.com/--http://www.safety-brite.net/

  8. #8
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personally, I'd take a habanero with maybe 1% of the heat. I'd love to get more of that unique fruity habanero flavor before incinerating myself. I heard that one of the pepper universities developed one with no capsaicin (for processing, like they did with Jalapenos), but I haven't seen seeds for sale and don't know if I'd buy them.

    Since there's some chile interest here, does anyone know the Valero (or Vallero) variety? I used to grow it, ran out of my seed supply and then discovered my source was gone. It's a thin-walled medium hot, medium sized chile that ripens red and always has three lobes at the tip. I've been searching for years and, the couple times I've come across the name, it was definitely a different variety.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •