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Thread: humidity question.

  1. #25
    Californian in DC DrWurm's Avatar
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    To put it in perspective, arguably the most popular and well known nursery's care sheet on the VFT mentions NOTHING about humidity. Why? Because it matters none. They can survive low humidity and cold winters. They can literally be snowed on in winter and come back the following spring.

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    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    I dont know if i would agree with "humidity doesnt matter" statement, especially if it is a long term condition. It is one of the factors that contol stomatal closure, along with light levels, substrate moisute levels, ABA levels etc. While the plant may survive, the question becomes "is the plant's overall condition or growth rate being affected by the low humidity?"

    Stomata respond directly to changes in humidity and to ABA released from roots upon the onset of drought stress. It has been postulated that ABA is released from mesophyll cells during drought and subsequently induces stomatal closure (Hartung et al., 1988).

    Stomata will initially open after a drop in air humidity, but stomatal closure sets in upon prolonged exposure times (Kappen et al., 1987; Mott et al., 1997). Closure of stomata, observed at low air humidity, apparently is not a simple consequence of turgor loss, but is a guard cell-controlled process.

    Stomata can be regarded as hydraulically driven valves in the leaf surface, which open to allow CO2 uptake and close to prevent excessive loss of water. Movement of these ‘Watergates’ is regulated by environmental conditions, such as light, CO2 and humidity. Guard cells can sense environmental conditions and function as motor cells within the stomatal complex. Stomatal movement results from the transport of K+ salts across the guard cell membranes. (M. Rob G. Roelfsema and Rainer Hedrich., 2005)


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  3. #27
    Californian in DC DrWurm's Avatar
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    That study sounds more like it applies to uncontrolled conditions. I'm pretty sure he can manage to keep the substrate moist, which in turn will elevate the local humidity around the plant. And like I said, I grow mine outdoors in his area and they thrive. Can't argue with the science of observation.

  4. #28
    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWurm View Post
    I'm pretty sure he can manage to keep the substrate moist, which in turn will elevate the local humidity around the plant.
    Now that I will agree with, a lot of factors come into play...

    Av
    Last edited by xvart; 01-02-2008 at 12:22 PM. Reason: added quote bracket

  5. #29
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWurm View Post
    To put it in perspective, arguably the most popular and well known nursery's care sheet on the VFT mentions NOTHING about humidity. Why? Because it matters none. They can survive low humidity and cold winters. They can literally be snowed on in winter and come back the following spring.
    well yeah..they can technically survive a light snow and a light freeze..
    but there is a big difference between a snow fall on wild VFTs in South Carolina, that lasts a day, two days tops, then quickly melts when it returns to 50 degree days..

    Versus the snow of the Northern states and Canada..which can last for 5 months with temps well below zero for weeks at a time..

    "snowed on" is very relative!

    In Atlanta, Georgia, I wouldnt worry if my VFTs get snowed on..
    In Rochester, NY, I would..

    Scot

  6. #30
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    To put the amount of snow we have here in the south into perspective, we got a light dusting of snow last night. By light dusting, I mean you could see through the layer of snow at whatever is underneath it. I'm guessing... not even a full quarter inch. It was all over the news this morning. The local grocery store was almost bought out. People freak at the lightest dusting of snow here because since it is so rare, it's a big deal. We might get one more light dusting,if we're "lucky", and won't see it again for another year.

    It IS very relative as Scot said. I'm in the N. GA mountains at the moment and it's not as warm as their natural habitat. There's "snow" then there's SNOW! I can't even comprehend the amount of snow, and the temperatures, that people up north get.

  7. #31
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustLikeAPill View Post
    To put the amount of snow we have here in the south into perspective, we got a light dusting of snow last night. By light dusting, I mean you could see through the layer of snow at whatever is underneath it. I'm guessing... not even a full quarter inch. It was all over the news this morning. The local grocery store was almost bought out. People freak at the lightest dusting of snow here because since it is so rare, it's a big deal. We might get one more light dusting,if we're "lucky", and won't see it again for another year.
    I always find that funny!
    In Rochester & Buffalo, a 6-inch snowfall IS "a light dusting"..no one even blinks...
    one or two feet overnight might slow things down a bit in the morning, but everything is back to normal by the drive home from work that afternoon..

    Its not a big deal until you get into the 3-foot range..then the schools close and you might not go into work..for one day only.

    We got 4" of snow last night..traffic was running normally when I went into work at 7am..
    I didnt even bother to shovel the driveway, its just a dusting.

    We are going to down to 5 degrees tonight..
    but up to 60 a week from today!
    major warming trend for the North East coming in a few days!

    Scot

  8. #32
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottychaos View Post
    yep..me too.
    I dont bother much with "acclimating slowly"..
    the plants always do fine..

    just stick them outside in the bright light and they do great.
    (VFTs and Sarrs..not Neps)

    Scot
    I take exception to this advice. I received 10 VFT's from xscd and potted them up. I had them in the attic where it was cool but not frigid. Then I had them under the porch for a week, so they could acclimate a bit before putting them in full sun. To all appearances they seemed adjusted, so I put them in full sun, where they all promptly "burned". All the xisting leaves died but it was also evident that there would be new growth. Only one plant actually died, but they were all set back.

    Then there was the move I had in late July. I put the whole collection outside on the porch until I could get something set up inside. Strangley, nothing reacted the first two days. But after the third day, all of my Mexican butterworts, nearly all of the utrics, and about half the sundews reacted. Ultimately, the butterworts nearly all recovered, as did the utrics. The sundews were the worst victims of the change from window sill / closet, under artificial lighting. I was picking dead plants for weeks thereafter. The VFT's, Sarrs, and temoerate sundews did fine.

    My point is that even stable, acclimated indoor plants can go into shock, if placed in direct sunlight.

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