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Thread: Fish in my tank

  1. #9
    swords's Avatar
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    Do your research - you have the internet so get those keyboard keys clacking on google. Don't assume any shop knows jack! Most are struggling and will sell you anything if you are gullible to believe it. Start by reading fish keeping web sites geared towards aquatic gardening and "natural aquariums".

    That's what I was talking about, plants that die after a little while because they are not true aquatics but tropical houseplants sold as aquarium plants. To avoid that order your live plants off the intrenet when the weather gets better that way you will get real aquatics. Or get a book on aquatic plants and shop with it and don't buy anything not listed in it.

    When you have thriving plants you will not use any airstones/air pumps except to diffuse the CO2, airstones/fast water movement will detroy delicate plants. When your plants have good light you will see bubbles forming on the leaves and eventually floating to the surface. This is your plants performing photosynthesis right infront of your eyes. This will only happen if you have bright lighting and after the water is depeleted of CO2 it will only happen with bright light and CO2 infusion.

    To make a DIY CO2 reactor drill a hole in the lid of a 2 liter soda bottle big enough to fit standard 1/8" tubing into the hole. Silicone a picee of airhose about 4-6 feet long silicone in place on the other end attach an airstone and sucker to hold the hose in place. Unscrew lid let dry. in the bottle add 2 cups of sugar to 1 liter of warm water, shake like crazy until it's disolved, add 1/2 teaspoon of dry active yeast to frothy sugar water, shake like crazy again and replace the lid put the bottle underneath your aquarium andput the hose with airstone and sucker into the aquarum at the bottom by the soil level so the co2 has to travel the whole height of the tank before it reaches the surface, this gives it more time to disolve, if the bubbles get hung up so much the better-they'll disolve slower. the empty space in your bottle is where the CO2 gas collects as the yeast eats the sugar and the gas will be forced up the hose and into your tank where the plants can get it. Don't use glass bottles for your reactor incase the hose should somehow clog, you'll have an exploding glass grenade!

  2. #10

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    Okay I understand don't trust the aquarium stores and I will buy/get a book from the library.
    That will be so cool though having aquatic plants that grow in my room along with my CPs.
    I have done reading about the yeast bottle CO2 reactor and I could do that it would make it more interesting. Then when the plants are happy then i'll add fish.
    I could cycle the tank for bacteria by adding ammonia then letting it cycle as suggested by this site http://animal-world.com/encyclo/fres...leAquarium.php .
    I like the looks of fancy guppies they seem economical,easy and pretty.
    I can order off of the internet too I can go to some natural/freshwater fish forums for the recommended vendors. Then get fish from the local shop maybe/mail ordering fish is that a bad idea ?
    I see this as another hobby/obsession/fun thing to do
    (I used too many "I"s )

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    Update well my mom told my dad about my idea,
    I knew my dad worked at an aquariums hop years ago and had a saltwater tank but thats all I barely knew. So he talked top me man he knows alot !!!! He said a canister filtration or under gravel is the best bet. He said maybe some small catfish and some tropicals. He said the aquatic plants are a great idea. The catfish may not be my idea but heck he is helping me and will help pay too. So I guess he know alot from keeping saltwater for years then working at a aqua shop

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    Nepenthes's Avatar
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    I've always wondered if something like this was possible. I was even considering placing african dwarf frogs in there since they are tiny and live in water their whole life. Please let me know how it works out .
    - Daniel

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    Well my dad says it will be done easy so i'll try frogs uhh I dunno I think maybe not

  6. #14
    swords's Avatar
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    I would go with a canister filter Or even the oldfashioned hang on the back filter for a planted tank, an undergravel will get chocked with plant roots before very long, the airstones which run undergravels will put too much oxygen in the water and drive off any supplemental CO2 you attempt to add - especially with the DIY CO2 which is pretty weak in comparison to an airstone powered by a luft pump. I used to feed my CO2 output line right into the "intake" on my canister filter, when a bubble of CO2 would get released it would get sucked into the canister, blasted into tinier bubbles and come out of the canister output giving a fine spray of CO2 bubbles every 10 minutes or so. Make sure the output from the canister is beneath the surface of the water to avoid agitating the surface which drives off the CO2 and artificially infuses oxygen in the water which is the oposite of what you want to do in a fully planted aquarium.

    Yes, definately get the plants happy first then add the fish. You will not need to introduce any chemicals to start up the bacterial cycle if you are using live plants. There will be plenty of live bacteria on the plants which will breed and spread over all surfaces in your aquarium and filter, just give it a little time, ading a tiny bit of flake food will help speed up the bacterial population but only use a pinch, too much and the algae will kick in, blocking light from the plants and they will die leaving you with a green soupy mess!

    When starting your planted tank go for fast growing plants at first such as Hygrophilla, Cabomba, etc. avoid things like Java Moss and slow growing rosette plants like Amazon swords, etc. because when the tank is cycling algae will be doing it's best to destroy your work thesefast growing plants will suck up all that nutrients and can be cut and immediately replanted next to the stand you cut them from so keep the water pure while the litte eco-system is getting settled. After a month or two of this you can start to remove the excess plantings of the fast growers add the slower growing "show" plants like colorful water lilies, amazon swords, etc.. Planted tanks are so fun, just talking about it is bring back all the old memories! ...it's only the water changes I don't miss!

    Fish and plants by mail is fine if the shipper knows what they're doing. You can get live plants and fish from www.aquabid.com it's like ebay but for fish! I got many of my killifish off there back in my fishkeeping days since they are next to impossible to get at the fish shops. I like Killis because they've very small but most are as colorful as saltwater reef fish and much easier to keep! Most killis are Annual meaning they don't live long but as long as your aquarium doesn't dry up like their pools do in the wild they will live 2+ years. Aphyosemion australe is an awesome non-annual species and is about 3-4", very freindly, bright orange, non jumpy and will even eat from your fingers. They also spawn like mad, if you would like to try raiusing babies with hatchling brine shrimp these guys are great fun!

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    My dad may say not to get things like fish ,snails and animals from the net but I will get the plants. So I see get the aquarium plants that grow quick. So I could grow some very small tropical lilies ? I can do canister I see those my dad says those are great like you have a sponge for the bacteria and then carbon pellets. My dad will have to do an airstone in there I will place it away form the plants. Man I m so looking forward to this
    Those fish sound interesting ,I may try to buy some plants from aqauabid since plants are easy to grow if I win some for very cheap that are fastish growing that could give me an edge before my dad gets home. Aqauabid is interesting I think I'd prefer ebay though for plants.

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    Why will you HAVE to do an airstone? If your plants are creating oxygen there is no need to supplement, it is in fact, not good for the plants by driving off CO2 and it generally creates too much water current and will shred the more delicate frilly plants such as cabomba and hygrophilla difformis (which can be planted or left as a floating mat plant).

    Once the fast growers are establishing then you can remove some of them (not too many) and put in the big Nymphaea lilies and sword plants but you wanna get the plants processing all nutrients in the water before dropping in the slow growing stuff (in a month or two) because they will take longer to establish and start absorbing the nutrients.

    Once the things like lilies and amazon swords start absorbing nutrients you may have to start fertilizing your aquarium with aquatic plant nutrients. I like Seachem's line of aquatic fertilizers. Iron is especially important to keeping your aquatics green, and it is the hardest nutrient to keep on supply in your aquarium water. I suggest an iron test kit and Seachem's liquid Iron supplement. You want readable levels of iron (but not high) but as long as it's detectable in your test your plants won't turn yellow from cholorosis which afflicts every heavily planted tank before long. in addition to Iron, a general liquid aquatic plant fertilizer that's high in potassium is pretty much mandatory for keeping the plants in top notch shape (potassium enables aquatic plants to absorb nutrients easier).

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