User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 13

Thread: Need help with buying a graphing calculator

  1. #1
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Need help with buying a graphing calculator

    Went shopping for school today and got some cool stuff. Wireless printer! Didn't know they made that. Anyway, I got a TI- Nspire. Got this because that's the best they had, and because my current calculator is Casio, was just like $50 when I got it, and EVERYONE seems to use TI so whenever I ask how to enter something in, their answer is totally not for my calculator.

    Anyway, I get home and find out it's not the latest and greatest from TI. It's big brother is. The TI-Nspire CAS. Apparently it uses symbols or something, I dunno. It says "plus a built-in Computer Algebra System. CAS adds an interactive dimension to exploring symbolic algebra and symbolic calculus, in addition to standard numeric calculations.".

    "
    TI-Nspire™ CAS Technology

    TI-Nspire functionality with a Computer Algebra System (CAS) built in.
    TI-Nspire™ CAS technology makes it possible to recognize, simplify and calculate math expressions, preserving the symbols including variables and terms such as e and π

    This ability to enter and view equations and expressions on screen as they appear in textbooks may be especially useful for step-by-step, arithmetic, algebraic and calculus calculations.

    Educators have the option to incorporate CAS into their instruction, using TI-Nspire CAS technology that is designed to help students:

    * Learn to solve equations step-by-step while avoiding common arithmetic errors.
    * Spend more time on specific math topics, from algebra through calculus.
    * Factor and expand expressions and solve common denominators.
    * See patterns and grasp the math behind the formulas.
    * Find common denominators
    "


    Now. Could someone tell me if it's worth the hassle returning it and getting the TI-Nspire CAS? Are the benefits apparent? Does anyone use it and like it? I got the TI-Nspire for like $144 tonight at Wal-Mart, and Amazon has the TI-Nspire for like... ten bucks more or so. Maybe 15-20 with free shipping. I didn't know if it was worth the hassle or now since I'm technologically illiterate. Using symbols seems like a time saver, but if I'm going to have to go in and change the value of the symbols constantly, it'll seem to negate the purpose of entering in lots of symbols in the first place. I should say I'm average in math. I've only done alg I, II, Geo and Trig thus far. My intention was to get a calculator now that I'd never have to replace because it couldn't do something I needed it to do. Not expecting quantum mechanics If I did replace it, I'd like it to be because a newer calculator came out that's easier to use and time saving, but does the same things as the one I'm about to buy .

    for the money these things cost, you'd think they'd put color screens in them.

  2. #2
    thepyro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ledyard, CT
    Posts
    39
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Basicly the CAS allows you to enter Solve(2x=2,x) and it will return 1.
    I'm guessing (I have a TI-89) that it will also integrate, take derivatives, ect. so it would also help you out in calculus. The one problem with it though is that it gives you the answer with out requiring you to do the work. If you pick up math concepts fast then I would personal get it because it makes things a lot faster.

  3. #3
    CPEnthusiast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    76
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey Clint,

    I would strongly advise you NOT to go out and exchange the one you have for the newer one. I'm not sure what kind of math you are going to be dealing with because I do not know your major or anything, but I've made it through some pretty high Calculus courses just using like a 5 year old TI. Plus, if you say you are technologically illiterate, using the new one is going to be even harder! One of my old friends used to have this TI that was like 5 steps up from mine, and it was seriously so confusing to try to use it because it had so many crazy buttons and different functions and what not. All you need for Calculus is a simple graphing calculator, and if it was me, I would go with the most simple, straight forward one I could find!

    Zach

  4. #4
    thepyro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ledyard, CT
    Posts
    39
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CPEnthusiast View Post
    Hey Clint,

    I would strongly advise you NOT to go out and exchange the one you have for the newer one. I'm not sure what kind of math you are going to be dealing with because I do not know your major or anything, but I've made it through some pretty high Calculus courses just using like a 5 year old TI. Plus, if you say you are technologically illiterate, using the new one is going to be even harder! One of my old friends used to have this TI that was like 5 steps up from mine, and it was seriously so confusing to try to use it because it had so many crazy buttons and different functions and what not. All you need for Calculus is a simple graphing calculator, and if it was me, I would go with the most simple, straight forward one I could find!

    Zach
    Zach dose have a point though the manual on my TI-89 is 1.5" thick

  5. #5
    Californian in DC DrWurm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    DC Area
    Posts
    1,169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    for the record, as far as normal graphing calcs go. CASIO > TI any day of the week. The GUI and menu interfaces are much less cumbersome than anything TI has.

  6. #6
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by thepyro View Post
    Basicly the CAS allows you to enter Solve(2x=2,x) and it will return 1.
    I'm guessing (I have a TI-89) that it will also integrate, take derivatives, ect. so it would also help you out in calculus. The one problem with it though is that it gives you the answer with out requiring you to do the work. If you pick up math concepts fast then I would personal get it because it makes things a lot faster.


    Answer my questions with no work? Well, looks like I need to go fine my receipt





    The manual that came with this was half the size of the Casio manual. Even if Casio is better (I dont even really know), everyone uses TI, it seems, and I've had so many problems when someone tells me how to do something.... on a TI.

  7. #7
    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Zone 8
    Posts
    5,594
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can't say that Casio is better than TI but since everyone uses TI I'd stick with that. I had a Casio way back in high school and I hated it because nobody else had one. I couldn't get any help using it.

    Additionally, I wouldn't worry too much about your instructors at college utilizing features from new technology in graphing calculators. Throughout time, in my experience, take forever to get on board with efficient and progressive ways of making their lessons interactive or more productive.

    And, old school TI's are awesome. TI-80 anyone?

    xvart.
    "The tragedy of life is not that every man loses; but that he almost wins."

    "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?"

  8. #8
    moonflower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    316
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had a similar experience to xvart's in high school with my first graphing calculator, also a Casio... I eventually caved and got a TI-83, and later a TI-89 in college. Basically, TI owns most school's souls, for better or worse... if you ever have a problem with a Casio in class, the teacher/prof will look at you and shrug their shoulders and go "Told you to get a TI".

    That said, the TI-89 was my BABY throughout all four years as a bio major... the ability to do derivatives and all kinds of other stuff (full statistical capabilities!) saved my skin in a surprising variety of classes. The manual is very intimidating but honestly, I only used it as a reference... I just looked up how to do assorted problems as I needed them, you don't need to read it cover to cover by any means. I don't know much about the version you have, but the 89 comes highly recommended from me

    Also, just FYI, I was required to get a TI-89 for calculus; you may want to check with professors and see if they want a particular model calculator.
    "Seeds? Oh yeah... sometimes I forget they grow from those. I feel like they should hatch or something."

    ~a friend's observation of my CP's

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •