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Thread: can sphagnum have too much water?

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    Capensis Killer upper's Avatar
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    can sphagnum have too much water?

    i'm trying to grow some live sphagnum and more after i get it from clint in a while, wanna know if there's such thing as... overwatering.... the sphagnum...
    Happy Holiday

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    They need to be kept saturated until the live material is established.

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    To me, saturated means full of water. Sphagnum prefers being moist, with open spaces full of air, not water.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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    Capensis Killer upper's Avatar
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    umm..... so it cant be partially drowned in water?
    Happy Holiday

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    I've never saturated it with water. Why would you saturate it? It's light a light and fluffy moss, not wet and soggy!

    Treat it like any other CP like Sarracenia or something. Keep it a little more moist in the beginning but not saturated. It liked frequent overhead waterings, not being grown as a semi aquatic. I'm sending you nice moss that you can lay out onto your media and pat down, anyway. There's not really anything to do. This is what I sent to the winner of the other auction. It was kind of compacted because I tried to stuff so much into the bag, so it's not as fluffy as yours will be. He said he loved it, though.





    BTW, you see some brown because all of the moss isn't laid facing upwards like it would grow and that's the media. You can wash it off it you want, but it's not necessary. This is because once it hit 50 bucks, I decided to pick through it and remove the weeds and sticks ( got about one cup worth out!). I figured that's the least I could do. What you'll get is pretty much plug and play. Pretty stuff. I forgot who won the other auction, but he said he wanted to plant a vertical wall with it and make a wet-wall. I hope that goes well and he posts pictures.

    Am I weird that I love the smell? lol.

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Live Sphagnum can be grown as a semi-aquatic. After all the "quivering bogs" are simply mats of Sphagnum moss floating on water.

    From Growing Carnivorous Plants, Barry A. Rice Timber Press 2006 page 178:

    Live Sphagnum plants with a coarse, large growth form are useful to make slurry trays, environments that are very useful for species that like extremely wet conditions, such as the near-aquatic Utriculari nelumbifolia. Add strands of sphagnum to a tray of water. Let the tray set for a few weeks in a sunny area, keeping it topped with water. If you did your job well, the Sphagnum plants will grow in the water as semi-aquatics.
    However for most purposes your best bet is to follow Av8tor1's guidelines:
    6. Water level is critical for respiration and photosynthesis. Most species of Sphagnum will appreciate an occasional flooding of 3 cm or less. Respiration and photosynthesis levels peak out with a water level of 12cm below the surface. (However, this is for mature cultures in which the sphagnum is over 12cm in height) In new cultures you must maintain the water level at a point that prevents the sphagnum from drying out. Browing of the tips is usually an indication that conditions require a higher water level.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    I've never seen semi-aquatic Sphagnum that looked very robust. At all.

    It's a pain to grow in Nepenthes pots. Needs watering like daily in my conditions. Or at least heavy daily misting. It grows SO fast, too. Especially outside.

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    Capensis Killer upper's Avatar
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    all the best looking live sphagnum that i've ever seen is either in a terrarium or with a ceph.

    ps. i just mailed out an envelope with 6$ with a letter to you.
    Happy Holiday

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