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Thread: Water Hardness (PPM)

  1. #1
    goldtrap2690's Avatar
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    Water Hardness (PPM)

    Hey Guys,

    It's been a while once again since I posted here. lately i've gotten into water gardening with Lotuses and getting into Victoria water lilies.

    To the point: I've always been curious about my water hardness and finally found info about where I live (I live in the San fernando Valley)

    http://www.ladwp.com/ladwp/cms/ladwp000498.jsp

    It's hard to understand but I'm guessing my water hardness is 74 ppm. Can someone please verify for me if it is 74?

    If so, what can and can't I water with my tap water?

    Is my water soft or hard?

    can I water my orchids with this water?

    -Tuyen Thi (Travis)

  2. #2
    BigBella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldtrap2690 View Post
    Hey Guys,

    It's been a while once again since I posted here. lately i've gotten into water gardening with Lotuses and getting into Victoria water lilies.

    To the point: I've always been curious about my water hardness and finally found info about where I live (I live in the San fernando Valley)

    http://www.ladwp.com/ladwp/cms/ladwp000498.jsp

    It's hard to understand but I'm guessing my water hardness is 74 ppm. Can someone please verify for me if it is 74?

    If so, what can and can't I water with my tap water?

    Is my water soft or hard?

    can I water my orchids with this water?

    -Tuyen Thi (Travis)
    You are definitely at the higher end of the spectrum of what is considered tolerable to "sensitive" plants, such as some orchids and most carnivores. Generally, you want water that is below 100 ppm in total dissolved solids (TDS) -- hopefully well below that number. If you are certain of your area's TDS rating (and that it is not simply some regional, annual statistical model like some -- that is to say, useless), you could probably get away with it, but be on the look-out for any mineral accumulation in pots or any decline in the health of your plants. A cheapo 15.00 TDS meter may be worth your consideration, especially if your plants are on the expensive side and your general trust of city resources is gauged in ppb . . . (http://secure.sciencecompany.com/HM-...16349C679.aspx)
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Take a water sample to a reputable aquarium store or pool store and have them do a hardness test. That data is from 1996 and is accurate only in a nondrought year!
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    You can find the TDS in the Annual Water Quality Report - http://www.ladwp.com/ladwp/cms/ladwp010711.pdf - and it lists the range for all the analyses they performed that year. You'll see the TDS is awfully high. Anyone served by a public water supply can get those data for their own supply. Larger water suppliers post it online, smaller ones don't. Whether they do or not, all are required to mail the results to their customers. If you live in an apartment, the customer might be the landlord, not you.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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