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Thread: i have a winter ?

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    I over winter a variety of Sarrs in Zone 6 CT, putting pots in a hole like others have described and piling leaves on them. I'll just add a couple points. First, be careful about the leaves you use. Oak leaves are great because they tend to curl a bit and form a fluffy blanket that allows air flow and even some light penetration. Those are all good things. Maple leaves tend to mat down and suffocate everything beneath them. The second thing is to be careful of snow. It can be a great insulator, but a problem can happen when warm days melt some of the snow. The water will percolate down and freeze. With more snow and more warm days, your plants eventually will be encased in a block of leafy ice. I lost a bunch of plants (only one CP) to that one winter. So now I put a lean-to over my plants to keep snow from piling up on them.
    Bruce in CT

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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPlantaholic View Post
    This whole dormancy thing is really confusing me.
    I've heard it's mainly controlled by photoperiod, but then i read (and you guys have said) that you leave yours in a cold place. What would happen if you let them go dormant (with photoperiod) in a room that is around 65 degrees? Does it NEED to be near freezing?
    Thanks for the help,
    Aaron

    edit-
    *PS...i'm mainly worried about the following cps:
    D. binata
    D. filiformis
    D. intermedia
    D. rotundifolia
    D. x obovata 'Ivan's Paddle'
    Darlingtonia Californica
    S. purpurea var. purpurea
    Aaron,
    where do you live?
    (the answers to your questions can be different..depending on where you live)

    Scot

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    CPlantaholic's Avatar
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    sorry, i used to have that posted on my avatar thing...
    ---Cedar Rapids, IA
    it can get down to -10 F in the winter.
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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    D. x 'Ivan's Paddle' does not require dormancy. You can grow it under lights all year round if you like at room temps. If not, treat it as D. rotundifolia or D. anglica and cut back on watering when it forms the winter bud. You should protect it from frost or temps below 40F as the D. anglica parent is the "Hawaii" tropical form.

    See the cultivar description for more details.

    Look up your Plant Hardiness Zone
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    nepenthes_ak's Avatar
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    So, the leaves dont leach nutrient's into the ground?

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Dormancy is a combination fo things. I can't put a percentage on it but photoperiod seems to be the most dominant variable. It also goes in one direction or the other. Temp seems to be the next important variable and that waffles in one direction or the other. Maybe that's why photoperiod is better guide for the plants. Lack of water and lack of food are also part of it. Temperate plants adapt to seasonal changes by going dormant when there is less light out, cold temps, and lack of water and food. By the same token, they make the best of things in the spring and summer. "Make hay when the sun shines", as it were. Even thoug theser are temperate plants, they grow in differing climates and locales. A D. intermedia (Cuba) can't take the cold as well as an S. purpurea, for instance. These plants can be stretched somewhat as to what they can tolerate, but some are better or worse than others.

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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nepenthes_ak View Post
    So, the leaves dont leach nutrient's into the ground?
    I doubt it..not enough to be of concern..

    Because at the climates where people are mulching their plants with leaves, its very cold all winter..(hence the need for the mulch in the first place)..the leaves dont really rot or break down much at all over the winter..its too cold.

    if you left a layer of leaf mulch on your bog ALL year, that would be a different story!
    the decomposing leaves would definately add nutrients..
    but they dont break done much at all November-March in the North..
    just remove the leaves in the spring, and all is good..

    Scot

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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPlantaholic View Post
    This whole dormancy thing is really confusing me.
    I've heard it's mainly controlled by photoperiod, but then i read (and you guys have said) that you leave yours in a cold place. What would happen if you let them go dormant (with photoperiod) in a room that is around 65 degrees? Does it NEED to be near freezing?
    Thanks for the help,
    Aaron

    edit-
    *PS...i'm mainly worried about the following cps:
    D. binata
    D. filiformis
    D. intermedia
    D. rotundifolia
    D. x obovata 'Ivan's Paddle'
    Darlingtonia Californica
    S. purpurea var. purpurea
    Quote Originally Posted by CPlantaholic View Post
    sorry, i used to have that posted on my avatar thing...
    ---Cedar Rapids, IA
    it can get down to -10 F in the winter.
    Aaron,
    Looks like you are zone 5..close to zone 4..thats pretty cold, too cold to overwinter VFTs and Sarracenia outdoors..I wouldnt risk it.

    Check out my Fridge method and USDA zones page:
    http://gold.mylargescale.com/scottychaos/CP/page2.html
    thoughts on zones are at the bottom of the page.

    Yes, reduced photoperiod and reduced temps are BOTH important..there has been some debate on which is MORE important, but IMO that debate is irrelevant...IMO BOTH are equally important, and both are very important, for a proper dormancy.

    IMO, 65 degrees would be far too warm..the plants wont go truly dormant in those temps..they will still grow, even with reduced photoperiod..you need a winter temp of 35-50 degrees..I would shoot for 40 personally, I would consider 50 probably ok, but iffy, on the warm end of the scale..

    This is why VFTs and Sarracenia cant really be grown indoors..they dont make good "windowsill" or terrarium plants..they need to be outdoors all season as photoperiod AND temps both gradually fall August-November..(photoperiod begins to reduce in JUNE!)

    "going dormant" is a long slow process..it begins at the summer solstice in June when photoperiod begins to slowly decrease..it accelerates as temps gradually fall through the autumn, and by November the plants should be fully dormant..THAT is when they need to go in the frdge, or cool attic, or cool basement, if you live in a climate with severe winters..
    (which you do)

    a room meant for human habitation all winter, with heated air at 65-70 degrees, is just far too warm..

    Sounds like nearly all your plants will need this kind of cool of dormancy..
    sorry, but the windowsill isnt going to work..

    Scot

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