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Thread: Calling all Mycorrhizal Users

  1. #1
    Two flies one pitcher. Minus the crap eating. obregon562's Avatar
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    Calling all Mycorrhizal Users

    Hey TF,

    Those of you (cough cough Av ) who use mycorrhizal fungi...

    What brand do you use? How do you innoculate the soil? What genera do you use it on? Whats your application rate (once a month, once every two months...)? How much do you use?

    Ive been very persuaded by some of the with/without pics ive seen in veggie forums and stuff, and i know Av's plants are insanely beautiful, so i wanna take a crack with this stuff. Any and all help is greatly appriciated!

    Thanks!
    Frankie

    P.S. How does this stuff compared to trichoderma? Is that what Av uses? Im so confuzed lol.
    "It's easy to rip on cops, when you aren't the one needing saving"

    My Growlist

  2. #2

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    Hi Frankie,

    I use Trichoderma T-22 strain. I inoculate my soil when i'm mixing it or if it's too late for that I mix with water and top water. I havent seen the vegetable kind of results but i did have a sundew and Nep really take off.
    Can I link the two? No, but it certainly does no harm and Trichoderma is known to prey on other types of fungi. If you're looking for proof I cant say i have or know of any but it's done no harm to a single plant or seedling I have.

  3. #3
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Butch uses the Trichoderma products from Ampacbiotech.net.

    I've tried it and have had more problems with fungus on my Cephalotus than before. YMMV. I know other LACPS members that sneer at the stuff and had to use extreme measures to get rid of it.

    I come to find out that Michael Lu sprays his Cephalotus once a month with a sulfur based fungicide. If you've ever seen his Cephalotus it must work well for him.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  4. #4
    RL7836's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by obregon562 View Post
    Those of you (cough cough Av ) who use mycorrhizal fungi...
    I used something called Eco-Max several years ago based on the recommendation of another grower. Never saw any discernible difference. Currently use a cocktail of 3 different Trichoderma products (one that also has some beneficial bacteria). For me, the jury's still out on Tricho products but I'm hopeful.....
    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    I've tried it and have had more problems with fungus on my Cephalotus than before. YMMV. I know other LACPS members that sneer at the stuff and had to use extreme measures to get rid of it.
    Wow - this is the 1st I've heard of negative feedback. Very interesting.
    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    I come to find out that Michael Lu sprays his Cephalotus once a month with a sulfur based fungicide. If you've ever seen his Cephalotus it must work well for him.
    In general, this is a procedure for creating super bugs that are resistant to a specific chemical.**

    Based on my personal experience with antibiotics and reading about the issues humans now have with the immune system fighting itself, I'm growing more & more reluctant to rely on chemical eradication procedures as a cure-all.*** I often wondered why natural CP populations didn't have the fungal issues that are seen by growers. Av & his allegiance to Tricho gave me my 1st possible explanation for this discrepancy between captivity & nature.

    While I believe the jury is still out (as mentioned above), this avenue of prevention is the 1st that seems to have a rationale built on something other than chemical-industry marketing, hot air or fertile imaginations....

    ... and while I also still believe that antibiotics & other chemical countermeasures have their place (duh!), I'm also coming to realize that their use has potential significant downsides - among them - elimination of symbiotic / synergistic organisms & possible resistance to control mechanisms...

    All the best,
    R


    ** - This has been drilled into me from:
    - years working in pharmaceutical industry
    - wife is a nurse
    - wife's grandmother was a disease specialist who specialized in drug resistance
    - - - Yikes!

    *** - Every spring the aphids attack our red honeysuckle vine which grows on our deck step railings (who's blooms are loved by hummingbirds). Each year I tried to kill them - typically with the Dawn / cooking oil / water spray mix advocated by many. Each year I was frustrated how far into the summer the aphids persisted before being consumed by ladybug larvae. Finally, I got tired & allowed nature to take it's course. The ladybug larvae appeared earlier & in greater numbers & the aphids were eradicated faster than any year when I 'helped'

    Soap box / pontification mode: OFF
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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  5. #5
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    I used something called Eco-Max several years ago based on the recommendation of another grower. Never saw any discernible difference. Currently use a cocktail of 3 different Trichoderma products (one that also has some beneficial bacteria). For me, the jury's still out on Tricho products but I'm hopeful.....
    I used the same triple cocktail last year on my Sarrs and it was the first year I did not get a single case of the dreaded rhizome melt. Not conclusive by any means but a point in its favor for me.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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  6. #6
    --Freedom Czar-- Fryster's Avatar
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    Is there a name for that "dreaded rhizome melt"??

    I lost most of my Sarr collection this winter due to a powdery-white mold that grows inside the rhizome underneath the base of the leaves/stalks.
    Only a moral and virtuous people are capable of freedom; the more corrupt and vicious a people becomes, the more it has need of masters. -- Benjamin Franklin

  7. #7
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    I agree with Ron about the risk of regularly spraying the same thing. The major benefit of monthly sulfur spraying might be that it acidifies the growing medium or maybe that the plants wanted more sulfur in their diet. But if a disease ever strikes, it probably won't be fazed by sulfur.

    As for aphids, the way to help them run amok is to eliminate their predators. Aphid problems disappeared when my community garden went organic because people weren't killing all the predators anymore. I cure aphid problems on my main plum tree by putting a ring of Tanglefoot around the trunk, which keeps ants off they tree. Otherwise, ants attack the ladybug larvae that keep aphids under control. A quick way to eliminate an infestation of aphids or whatever on a potted plant is to stick it in a dense patch of weeds or unsprayed, thickly planted flower bed or garden (during the growing season, of course). The aphids will be gone within a couple days. Aphids teach us that it is better to work with the ecosystem than to fight against it.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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