User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 22

Thread: Want to make a bonsai.

  1. #1
    Hear the Call of Nepenthes carnivoure12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,643
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Want to make a bonsai.

    Hi everyone, i'd like to ask the bonsai community, what type of tree would be the easiest for a bonsai?

    Around here there are lilac trees, maple trees, crabapple trees, and few more, are any of the mentioned easy? Which one would you recommend? What time of year is the best to take cuttings? Which is the mest method for rooting? Can I take cutting now, the tree are just coming out from dormancy.

    Please help me, and thanks in advanced.
    -Carnivoure12
    →Growlist

  2. #2
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not into bonsai, but know that you have to consider a plant's annual cycle. I think the ones you listed need four distinct seasons, like a lot of our CPs.

    As for how to start them, either search for a plant propagation webpage (there are plenty) or find a book at the library. Many plants have very specific requirements.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  3. #3
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd be interested to know about cuttings too.

    Yeah, I remember the seasons thing from my old Bonsai books (which I sold on ebay in one huge lot a decade ago and now wish I hadn't). Most true Bonsai trees gotta be kept outside to experience the weather (since they are actual trees) unless you use some kinda tropical plant like a Ficus (some of these look great like a mini-banyan tree) or even a large Crassula (succulent) can be made to look like a pseudo-bonsai tree after a while and they can be kept indoors year round and need to be kept from frost unlike a maple or oak which has to go dormant.

  4. #4
    Hear the Call of Nepenthes carnivoure12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,643
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I must mention all the trees I listed grow here in Toronto Canada, we get spring, summer, winter, and fall. They're growing in my backyard.

    Even though there are sites out there I want some input from here
    -Carnivoure12
    →Growlist

  5. #5
    The Consuming Flame EdaxFlamma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DE
    Posts
    487
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Chinese elm, fukien tea, azalea, ficus, pines, maple, cyprus, wisteria, english ivy, grape and countless others work well. Any plant with a semi woody to woody base can in theory become a bonsai. My personal favorite bonsai starters are plants that grow wild in Virginia we call them "free shrubs" but they are actually a type of English hedge that was introduced a long time ago and went wild. I'll see if I can dig up the real name.

    I never have good luck with cuttings to be perfectly honest. I either start with nursery stock or wild collect "weed trees" off of my own property. The benefits are that the plant already does well in your area, the weedy ones now have a use or maybe will tolerate harder pruning, and you have tons of free start up while you are learning. The latter is nice especially when you start trying out jin and shari techniques. I have the luxury of being in a wooded part of the back country. Those in the city I would recommend looking for small plants at nurseries or seeing what you can get in gardening magazines. Some magazines sell hedging plants really cheap in lots of 5 or more at heights of about 8"-12" which is perfect (for me).

    Easiest bonsai? hmmm. Depends on the climate. Like I said go with whats thriving outside. Pines are hard to prune for me as are ficus. Pines because needle pinching is a pain and ficus because they don't bud back on old wood without complete defoliation and that's if you are lucky..

    And my biggest advice - go easy on the wiring... What they don't normally say is that it should act like a cage not a straight jacket. You can do some serious damage to your plants that takes years to go away. I tend to try and avoid wiring unless completely necessary. Formative pruning is more of my thing.
    Trying to rebuild. Feel free to PM me with questions.

    Grow/Want List

  6. #6
    Dog! maneatingmoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Seattle, Washington
    Posts
    705
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm interested in bonsai too. They're pretty cool, but I've read they require a bit of special care to keep them their small size. Something I'd like to see turned into a bonsai is a Cherry Blossom tree. We have those growing all over in Washington. They grow tons of small, pretty pink flowers in the spring, and look like normal trees the rest of the year.
    The following statement is true.
    The above statement is false.
    My growing growlist of growing things

  7. #7
    The Consuming Flame EdaxFlamma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DE
    Posts
    487
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lots of pruning... I have heard rumors of people using some growth regulating hormone on their plants to keep them small but that's just not right. With the cherry blossoms the size of the flower limits you (technically) on how small you can make the tree. Leaves can be shrunken by complete defoliation (in some cases) but flower size pretty much remains constant. I don't doubt that it's been done though.
    Trying to rebuild. Feel free to PM me with questions.

    Grow/Want List

  8. #8
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like the larger size bonsai which is good for the blooming trees who can't be shrunk down too small. I'd like to try a weeping cherry maybe 18"-24" high. Looks like a cross between a weeping willow and blooming cherry. Although most weeping bonsai I've seen in books don't look as good as the full sized. They always seem to look rather sparse.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. bonsai
    By tinyjeans in forum Miscellaneous Plants
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-08-2007, 02:03 PM
  2. Bonsai
    By Jmenprkr in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-18-2003, 08:54 PM
  3. Anybody here do bonsai?
    By al885 in forum Miscellaneous Plants
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-05-2003, 09:57 AM
  4. Anybody here do bonsai?
    By al885 in forum Orchids
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-28-2003, 07:54 PM
  5. Bonsai
    By sarracenialuver in forum Miscellaneous Plants
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-25-2002, 02:42 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •