User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 17 to 22 of 22

Thread: I Went into Nature - Are These Both Moss?

  1. #17
    ellisonk001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mililani Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for sharing your beautiful pictures of the bog.

  2. #18
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,806
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    polytrichum is a beautiful genus of mosses. Although..looking at one, it is very very very hard to recognize them directly. Most mosses cannot be recognized without looking at its cell structure and most importantly its spore capsule. Either way...I do have polytrichum from different sources and one of the most common ones is polytrichum commune. The moss grows differently depending on the amount of light it gets. Most mosses in general grow in bright shade and I would assume polytrichum likes the same. It generally acts as a scaffolding moss for sphagnum when peat bogs are restored. On a layer of fresh peat...generally when spores and chopped up sphagnum from virgin bogs are scattered, polytrichum is the first to come up. Sphagnum uses this now support moss and the extra humidity to slowly gain control. The polytrichum does tend to hang on in few places, but most times sphagnum just overruns the polytrichum profusely.
    Polytrichum so in general is just like sphagnum..it doesn't harm your plants and can be grown for the top dressing. However, it is notorious for suffocating seedlings and smaller plants. It should be avoided for plants like pygmy sundews and short rosetted dews in general. However, for plants like neps, it is perhaps among the most beautiful ground cover that you can encourage. THe moss is also different in the sense that its a very stringy moss...it doesn't compact like sphagnum and has a lot of air packets in it. This makes it ideal for nep media mixes as well. ALthough, from experience, I have found that it tends to be extra open forcing you to water the plant a lot more regularly than other mixes.

  3. #19
    wicked good plants! Presto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,257
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TENroaches View Post

    Does anyone know what the heck that is?
    There are temperate cactus species native to the northeast, believe it or not! Check out Opuntia humifusa... I think there are others, as well. They're not something I'm extremely familiar with, but I thought it was neat that cacti don't just live in the desert!
    -Emily

  4. #20
    TENroaches's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    317
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Look what popped up in my planter today. I'm debating moving it to a place with less light, out of my planter with sarrs and liverworts and other moss.





    It looks like the tips are browning. That's why I might move it to a shadier spot, but I'm afraid. I don't want this to die.
    Tim

    Grow List

    bogspot - my blog about my plants

  5. #21
    SirKristoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Puyallup, WA United States
    Posts
    4,132
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    we have an incredibly large amount of haircap moss that grows here, everywhere lol. im thinking of trying some of it with some plants, im worried about pests though, ill wait for some of the spore heads to pop up i think lol

  6. #22
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I once left a pile of old potting mix (LFS & sponge rock) in a pot saucer, or whatever those water catchers are called, and forgot about it. It was outside in a shady spot for a long time and one day I noticed it was green. It had compacted down to a low mound that was mostly covered with regular ground moss, but with patches of hair-cap moss too. It was beautiful, in a subtle way. After finding it, I left it out there for a couple more years and did nothing for it, other than to water it a couple times when the weather was unusually dry to pull out the weed and tree seedlings that tried to invade it. Unfortunately, I found it all ripped up and dried out last year and I think a squirrel or bird tore it apart.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. Does your cat have the Buddah nature?
    By swords in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-28-2009, 04:57 AM
  2. Mother Nature knows best
    By ilbasso in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-27-2008, 10:57 PM
  3. The nature conservancy
    By Treaqum in forum Venus Flytrap (Dionaea ) Care Information & Tips
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-15-2004, 03:28 PM
  4. Nature pictures set #1
    By elgecko in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-28-2004, 09:20 AM
  5. Nature pictures #2
    By elgecko in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-26-2004, 04:42 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •