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Thread: Melted Snow = Rainwater?

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    TENroaches's Avatar
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    Melted Snow = Rainwater?

    In the wintertime, can I just go get tons of snow from outside and let it melt to water my indoor CPs, like my sundews and my Nep?
    Tim

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    Devon's Avatar
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    yup, just make sure the snow is clean. And I'm pretty sure, but not certain that neps can take tap water... not sure though

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    Yup, I did this last winter. You'll be surprised how little lots of snow will yield in terms of water!

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    TENroaches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by F R e N c H 3 z View Post
    Yup, I did this last winter. You'll be surprised how little lots of snow will yield in terms of water!
    I think they say 10" of snow is 1" of rain.
    Tim

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    The water yield depends on the snow. Newly fallen powder snow has much less than 1" of water in 10" of snow, while a slushy, wet snow will have much more. Either way, you'll be surprised at how little water you get.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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    if you have a bunch of empty jugs, you can accumulate a decent stockpile of water over the course of winter. just watch for yellow snow ;-)

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    Unless you have exceptional tap water (take it somewhere and have a battery of tests done on it to find out) don't use it on your Neps. In a total emergency you can but be sure to flush those pots with distilled water several times after you do. Sodium salts can be a root killer for many plants, not just CPs. As the tap water dries it leaves sodium deposits behind, let a clear glass of your tap water evaporate for a few days, is there anything left behind on the glass? Quite often there is, and the concentrations can vary over time. This can crystallize on the roots just like the glass and this can inhibit further water uptake and root growth.

    As far as snow goes, try it! Make sure you collect it away from where anyone uses that winter Ice Melt stuff - don't get the snow off your sidewalk or where sidewalk snow gets deposited when it's shoveled/snow blown.

    Thanks to TenRoaches his topic has given me an idea and maybe a project... If you have the tools use a 2" hole saw on your power drill to make a hole at the bottom edge of a large rubbermaid container and put a 2" ballvalve from Home depot in it. Gluing with aquarium safe silicone of course. Put a screw on hose on the free end of the ballvalve (for filling your water jugs). Then you can shovel your snow into the rubbermaid and set it on a table or chair until it melts overnight or so and then fill your water jugs. Just make sure the ball valve is closed before you go to bed and let it melt!

    In summer I suppose you can use the same container to catch rain... Both rain and snow are heavy to lug so maybe the container shouldn't be more than 10 gallons or like 40 Liters in size? That'll be about 85lbs if it's full of actual rain water.

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    Swords, as an option too a battery of tests, just call the local water dept. and ask the tds content of the water. They better than anyone know the real results and have no incentive to lie to you. I'm very lucky in my town as tapwater is from a snow/rain watershed averaging 75 ppm most of the year!

    You can use as large a container as you like to catch the rain; just make sure to put a valve or tap at the bottom so you can put it in a portable container like Swords said. I know a guy with two 400 ft. long greenhouses that dispel rainwater into trenches than tubes leading to a few huge holding tanks. He's always got water, clean water.
    Good growing, Jack
    "Never doubt that a small group of concerned citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead, American Anthropologist

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