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Thread: Baker's Yeast & Sugar = Ethano & Carbon Dioxide

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Baker's Yeast & Sugar = Ethano & Carbon Dioxide

    That dry ice topic and Aviator's post that didn't develop got me thinking... and googling:

    Supermarket products:
    sucrose
    fructose
    lactose
    baker's yeast

    Apparatus and glass wares:
    hotplate
    3 beakers 100 mL
    3 snap-cap vials 20 mL
    glass stirring rod
    watchglass d = 8 cm
    thermometer


    Experimental procedure:

    40 mL of water are placed in each of three 100 mL beakers. 10 g of sugar are dissolved - in beaker 1 lactose, in beaker 2 fructose and in beaker 3 sucrose. 1 g of baker' yeast is adedd to each of the sugar solutions. The solutions are warmed to 25 to 40 C.


    Results:

    An unequal strong foaming can be observed in the three beakers. The strongest foaming occurs in the beaker containing glucose. A moderate foaming takes place in the beaker with fructose. Evidently lactose does not react with yeast.





    http://video.uni-regensburg.de:8080/...te/Backhefe.rm


    Discussion and background:

    Baker's yeast enzymes convert sugar (glucose, fructose) to ethanol and carbon dioxide. The fermentation process is accompanied by the release of carbon dioxide which causes foaming.

    Baker's yeast is cultivated from the strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae because of its superior fermentation abilities. The yeast propagates in pure culture using special culture media comprised of melasse and other ingredients. With respect to their metabolism baker' yeasts are facultative anaerobe. They can ferment or respire depending upon environmental conditions. In the presence of oxygen respiration takes place, without oxygen present, fermentation occurs.

    Baker's yeast plays a key role in bread dough fermentation. Amylases present in flour, break down starch into a smaller sugar, maltose. The reaction starts as soon as water is added to the flour and stops during baking. The action of the flour amylases is completed by an enzyme of yeast, the maltase, which splits maltose into two glucose molecules. Glucose is fermented by the yeast to ethanol and carbon dioxide.



    Whaddya think?

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    I think if you've got no access to dry ice then this is the best way to go. It's not the most pleasant smell or cleanest way though. I'd be curious to see the amounts of CO2 released form each method; my bet says dry ice releases more over a short period while the yeast releases a small quantity over a long period.

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    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    When I had planted aquariums I played with the ratios till I got a pretty constant output. It would last a couple weeks too!

    Too much yeast gave a larger output but one that was short lived.

    I used a welch's grape juice bottle that I siliconed an aquarium hose to the lid... IIRC for that size bottle it was a tbl of yeast to a cup or two of sugar... cant remember about the sugar exactly.

    But for my purposes, this allowed me to maintain the proper CO2 level and proper pH. The resultant carbonic acid maintained my pH at 6.8 IIRC (none of the nasty side effect of adding phosphoric acid, just as nature intended)

    It worked outstanding for my purposes, It was a beautiful set up that was a self supporting ecosystem, It maintianed a nice daphina population so I didnt even have to feed the fish. All I did was give it light and CO2, it had no filtration at all.

    all of this is sorta foggy.... we are talking 20 yrs ago

    IIRC baking soda and vinegar is another method if you need some in a hurry

    oh and when you go to empty the used up mash, omg.... ewwww

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Dry Ice makes me uncomfortable because of the cold temps that it could produce. I just wanna produce CO2 to asphyxiate aphids!

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    I"m just curious if you could get enough CO2 production to attain lethal levels for the aphids using the bakers yeast method. It may require more than just a few bottles.
    I'm going to see if my local Meijer has some dry ice. I'll let you know about the temperature and dry ice when I find out JimScott

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    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    Jim, have a squizz at this:
    http://www.motosport.com/dirtbike/pr...talogId=103039

    for our purpose, this would be the route I would go
    Av

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    RL7836's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    Dry Ice makes me uncomfortable because of the cold temps that it could produce. I just wanna produce CO2 to asphyxiate aphids!
    If you use hot water on the dry ice, there will be less than a 5*F temp drop in the tank (and 'pour' the mist in from the top as I did).

    With the yeast method, I doubt that you could ever get CO2 levels that would kill the aphids.

    As for the the vinegar / baking soda routine - the foam up that you get upon mixing can be difficult to control and the resulting mix is toxic to plants. Yes - even knowing the risks and knowing about the "foam up", I tried this approach when I was having difficulty locating some dry ice. As expected, one of the mixes was more violent than expected and foamed over some of the pots. Even after rinsing for a long period, I still lost one of the pots(U. blanchetii iirc). That's when I drove the 40 min (1 way) to the ice cream place and got the dry ice....

    If you're still scared of low temps, try Av's method. Low risk - eh?
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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    cmm889's Avatar
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    interesting, I've never heard of this method for killing aphids, does it work for other pests?

    if this worked well i'd love to try it

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