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Thread: CP's and mites

  1. #1

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    CP's and mites

    So I have some orchids and one of them got spider mites, I isolated it and tried to minimize the spread but those buggers got into the others. I have a Very limited space to keep everyone (all my plants) until I can move the CP's outside and sadly everyone got attacked.

    This is the formula that I plan on dunking the orchids in:
    A bucket of water with a couple of drops of a growth regulator. (1 tbsp. per 5 gallons)

    I repeated the process 10 days after that

    Then I spray everyone down with mixture of:
    1 part of rubbing alcohol
    1 part of 409
    4 parts of water

    Will this hurt the CPs? If so what can I do to clean them? I don't have the growth regulator yet but it's on the top of the to-get list so should I look for something else while I'm at it?

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I don't know. So I did a little googling:

    Control Strategies
    Early detection of spider mites, before damage is noticed, is important. The tiny spider mites can be detected by taking a piece of white paper or cardboard and striking some plant foliage on it. The mites can be seen walking slowly on the paper. If 10 or more mites per sample are common, controls may be needed.

    Option 1: Cultural Control - Syringing Since rainy weather seems to knock off spider mites, using a forceful jet of water from a hose (syringing) can perform the same task. A regular syringing can keep spider mites under control on most ornamental plants in the landscape. This technique also helps conserve natural predators.

    Option 2: Cultural Control - Quarantine and Inspection The twospotted spider mite is often introduced on infested bedding and house plants. When purchasing new plants, carefully inspect the lower leaf surface for any signs of mite activity. New house plants should be quarantined from other plants until you are sure that no mites are present.

    Option 3: Biological Control - Predators There are numerous insects (lacewings and lady beetles) that prey on spider mites. However, the most commonly sold predators are other types of mites. Predatory mites (usually Phytoseiulus spp., Amblyseius spp. or Metaseiulus spp.) can be purchased and released onto infested plants. Be sure to check listings to determine which species is appropriate. Some species are host specific and each predator works better under different weather conditions. If predators are used, do not apply pesticides that will kill them.

    Option 4: Chemical Control - "Soft Pesticides" Most spider mites can be controlled with insecticidal oils and soaps. The oils, both horticultural oil and dormant oil, can be used. Horticultural oils can be used on perennial and woody ornamentals during the summer at the 1 to 2 percent rate. Higher rates of horticultural oil (3 to 4 percent) or dormant oil are useful for killing mite eggs and dormant adults in the fall and spring. The insecticidal soaps are useful in the warm season. Remember that mites are very tiny and soaps and oils work by contact only. Therefore, thorough coverage of the plant is necessary for good control.

    Option 5: Chemical Control - Miticides Spider mites are usually not killed by regular insecticides, so be sure to check the pesticide label to see if "miticide" is present. Pesticides claiming "for mite suppression" are usually weak miticides and will not perform well. There are few products available to the homeowner. Dicofol (=Kelthane) is registered for over-the-counter use but is difficult to find. Acephate (=Orthene), dimethoate (=Cygon), chlorpyrifos (=Dursban), diazinon, disulfoton (=Di-syston), and malathion have over-the-counter product labels but are considered weak miticides.

    Avermectin (=Avid), bifenthrin (=Talstar), dienochlor (=Pentac), fenbutatin-oxide (=Vendex), fluvalinate (=Mavrik), oxamyl (=Vydate), oxydemeton-methyl (Metasystox-R), oxythioquinox (Morestan), and propargite (=Omite) are restricted use pesticides available only to licensed applicators.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://http://www.google.com/url?sa=...4jDtJQRgANy3lw

    http://http://www.google.com/url?sa=...wIfqyjCNcj3feQ

    In that last link I see Neem Oil listed. Neem is a very good compound for CP's, in general, and aphids, specifically. Neem can be purchased at places like Lowes. I use it to eliminate aphids.

  3. #3
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    I don't know about the growth regulator but I've used the 409 solution on Sarracenia with no ill effects. Most insecticidal soaps contain potassium salts which isn't something good for carnivorous plants. Extreme caution is advised when using soaps.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  4. #4

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    hmm alright, the growth regulator is used to make the females infertile and to kill the eggs...I might try it on one plant and see how it goes. Thanks all.

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