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Thread: Brie's CP photo thread

  1. #201
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brie View Post
    I thought the snap tentacles were unique to admirabilis?
    I thought the only species with true snap tentacles was D. glanduligera? Or am I totally behind on this...
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

  2. #202
    Peatmoss's Avatar
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    A bunch of species have got em but glanduligera is the fastest.

  3. #203
    limeslide's Avatar
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    Yep, Peatmoss is correct. Other species with prominent snap tentacles are D. burmanii, D. sessifolia, and D. glanduligera as Peatmoss mentioned. I'm not sure if D. admirabillis grows snap tentacles.

  4. #204
    Peatmoss's Avatar
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    I believe it does:

    http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/a..._curling-1.JPG

    The "snap tentacles and runway lights" documentary is worth watching, although it is 50 minutes long.

  5. #205
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Snap tentacles are found on many Drosera. Some are only present in the seedling stages. Siegfried Hartmeyer, who coined the term Schnelltentantakel "Snap tentacle" applies the term to the longer tentacles on the leaf margin. He characterizes them in three types:

    T1 - symmetrical glandular head producing mucilage (dew), similar to but longer than the upright tentacles on the face of the leaf - mainly on upright species e.g. D. scorpioides
    T2 - bi symmetrical head (rectangular, squarish) non-glandular does not produce mucilage - mainly basal rosetted plants. e.g. Drosera burmannii
    T3 - starts with wide base with a joint/hinge connecting a longer thin upper portion, head is bi symmetrical non-glandular

    So far T3 is found only on Drosera glanduligera.

    Hartmeyer writes:

    http://www.hartmeyer.de/ArtikelundBe...naptent_GB.htm
    New investigations of meanwhile more than 100 species (after our DVD has been released) show that the seedlings of all (investigated) species of section Drosera develop snap-tentacles, not only D. binata. Also the seedlings of section Lasiocephala, where no adult plant possess them. Only the archaic species D. arcturi, D. regia, and strange enough the modern tuberous Drosera do not. D. glanduligera is again special and starts only with glue-tentacles, then intermediate tentacle-heads are developed and only the 3rd or 4th leaf generation shows the ready developed spring trap. An upgrading article on this topic is ready written and only waiting to be published. The story goes on.
    Section Drosera contains nearly all of the rosetted South African Drosera.

    His later article published in CPN notes:
    http://www.hartmeyer.de/ArtikelundBe...runCPN2010.htm

    Most of the African species are also assigned to section Drosera, but D. admirabilis, D. aliciae, D. cuneifolia, and most of the other examined plants possess large rectangular T2-tentacle heads like D. rotundifolia or D. spatulata. In this connection also, the rectangular heads of D. burmannii (Australasia) and D. sessilifolia (South America) should be mentioned again. A good example for the development of modern tentacles during the maturation of erect plants is the South African D. cistiflora (section Ptycnostigma) which has first round, later drop-shaped T2-heads as long as it grows as basal rosette, but only two or three leaf-generations after the erect growth started, only sticky T1-tentacles appear in their place.
    Hartmeyer notes that the heads of the snap tentacles seem to be unique among species. This may provide another systemic to identify species no work in this area as of this writing has been published.

    View Hartmeyer's videos on Snap Tentacles:




    view the entire 2006 video "Snap Tentacles and Runway Lights"


    Both articles and the video name a number of the species that have been observed having snap tentacles.

    Personal observations:
    D. venusta


    D. aliciae

    D. trinervia

    D. admirabilis



    The major problem I see with identifying your plant as D. admirabilis is that the area free of tentacles at the base of the leaf. With D. admirabilis the tentacles zone to start almost at the growing point. Refer to Mass' photo as well as mine above. This tentacle free area is more characteristic of D. natalensis or D. venusta. From Debbert's type diagnosis of D. venusta (translated from German via Google Translate, some revision by me):
    In the lower third the leaf is without tentacles and without hair, in the upper part filled with tentacles."

    These are Debbert's own drawings and photographs published in his descriptions of D. admirabilis and D. venusta. Compare the leaf structure

    Figure 1: Drosera admirabilis. 1. Rosette of leaves;
    2. leaf; 3. Base of flower stem; 4 Sepal; 5 Petal;
    6 Style; 7 Seeds.

    Figure 2: Drosera venusta. 1 Rosette of leaves; 2 rosette
    from the side; 3 leaf; 4 Stipules; 5 flower stem; 6 Sepal;
    7 petal; 8 Style; 9 Seeds.


    Get photos of the flowers. Here is the D. admirabilis growing in my collection:


    How do I know it is D. admirabilis? Compare the style with Debbert's drawings above. For completeness here are Diels' drawings of the flowers of D. natalensis (G, H, J). Note the similarity of the style of D. venusta:


    Trying to identify Drosera species from photos on the Internet is difficult at best - futile at worst. So many of the plants in the photos are misidentified/mislabeled or don't show enough detail of the structures needed to identify a species.

    Edit: Added D. venusta flower:
    Last edited by Not a Number; 01-06-2012 at 01:47 PM.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  6. #206
    Sarracenia freak Brie's Avatar
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    Warren, forgot to reply and say thanks for taking the time to post all that.. Was very informative..

    ---------- Post added at 03:19 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:07 PM ----------

    So here's another pic update...

    First off, looks like i'm joining the Heli Flower Club... My little H. Tequila division is sending up a flower along with its first pitcher for me... Which is awesome, but at the same time, this plant is in a 10gal tank, which is only 2" below the lights.. so uh.. where the heck is this flower gunna go?? ugh.




    And looks like my N. ROBCANTLEYI is going to have a pitcher with a lid this time..


    One of the many new D. indica I just picked in trade from B0B


    The D. capensis "Bainskloof" starting to put on some new growth


    All the wee baby Falconeri are looking good








    Springtail covered P. primulaflora, sending up its first flower ever for me. YAY!


    P. laueana gettings its first carnivorous leaves for me... Been dormant a loonngg time


    My biggest ping, P. moctezumae x gigantea


    Baby P. gysicolas are getting bigger, slowly but surely




    Anndd last but not least, my P. reticulata babies, also getting big


    Last edited by Brie; 01-08-2012 at 05:19 PM.

  7. #207
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Super nice as always Brie.

  8. #208
    mass's Avatar
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    Dang.. You've got mad skills woman. So jealous..
    Definitely need to find indica one of these days.

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