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Thread: CP's in Long Island and Martha's Vineyard - DUW!

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    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    CP's in Long Island and Martha's Vineyard - DUW!

    I was able to get a couple of plant excursions while on vacation with my wife... she is a good sport!

    Long Island:


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    Pond habitat on Long Island. I was able to find populations of Drosera intermedia, Drosera rotundifolia, Drosera filiformis and several Utricularia.



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    Drosera rotundifolia only grew on beds of sphagnum moss, whereas Drosera intermedia preferred to be soaking wet in peat.

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    Drosera intermedia almost completely submerged.





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    Thick carpet of Drosera intermedia growing on the edge of the pond. This was the best population I could find. Look closely to see the stem forming habit in this locale.





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    The largest Drosera intermedia plants were growing on elevated stems.



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    Sarracenia purpurea growing in another location on Long Island along with Drosera rotundifolia.



    Martha's Vineyard:



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    Drosera rotundifolia growing in a cranberry bog



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    Drosera growing between wooden planks. Tough little plants!

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    Charlatan lizasaur's Avatar
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    Oh wow, very nice shots! It looks like you had an absolutely beautiful time!

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    GregNY's Avatar
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    Very nice shots, nice excursion

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    quogue's Avatar
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    Great pics! It's been years since I've been to those locations, makes me think I should make some time this Summer!

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    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    Thanks for the compliments. It was great seeing so many drosera in their natural habitat. The Long Island population was especially strong!

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    Eats genetically engineered tomatoes Sig's Avatar
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    Awesome! I really have to find a bog nearby to see stuff like this.
    Formerly known as Silenceisgod!

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    Hi Baylorguy:

    Niice shots. Your 3rd photograph from the bottom looks suspiciously like D. intermedia x D. rotundifolia. The angle is not the best for a determination but the color of the leaf and ovate shape of the blade look like this hydrid. The S. purpurea populations on Long Island are quite valuable since 60% of historic sites have been lost.

    Sincerely,

    Phil Sheridan, Ph.D.
    Director
    Meadowview Biological
    Research Station

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    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    Thanks Phil -

    Very well could be a hybrid. Drosera intermedia and Drosera rotundifolia were growing side by side.

    Quote Originally Posted by meadowview View Post
    Hi Baylorguy:

    Niice shots. Your 3rd photograph from the bottom looks suspiciously like D. intermedia x D. rotundifolia. The angle is not the best for a determination but the color of the leaf and ovate shape of the blade look like this hydrid. The S. purpurea populations on Long Island are quite valuable since 60% of historic sites have been lost.

    Sincerely,

    Phil Sheridan, Ph.D.
    Director
    Meadowview Biological
    Research Station

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