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Thread: Growing non-native Sarracenias near native populations

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    Growing non-native Sarracenias near native populations

    I live approximately 3 miles from a Sarracenia bog. Is this close enough so that I should be concerned that my non-native Sarracenia species might cross-pollinate with plants in the natural bog? None of my plants are flowering age yet, so I'm not worried that this may have happened. I just want to ensure that I don't contaminate the native population.

    Thanks

    Tom

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    I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me. jpappy789's Avatar
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    Isn't is common practice to cut off Sarr flowers unless specifically collecting seed anyways?
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    mass's Avatar
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    Interesting question.. I just recently inquired about introducing NATIVE species to an area that "should" contain them, but doesn't.

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    Eats genetically engineered tomatoes Sig's Avatar
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    Here's the thing: It's possible, though unlikely. Bees can and sometimes do travel that far. It's a pretty low chance, but it's possible.

    Good for you that you want to protect the native populations, but I don't think there's much you can do other than cutting the flower off or covering it in plastic or something.
    Formerly known as Silenceisgod!

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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    Bumble bees usually have a range of about a mile. This has happened in a bog in Virginia. Luckily we were able to remove the plants, which were very localized.

    When living so close to such a valuable area, err on the side of caution.

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    D_muscipula's Avatar
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    I would snip the flowers just to be safe.
    Better safe than sorry.
    Last thing we'd want is to mess up the gene pool of the natives.
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