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Thread: what camera are you using?

  1. #1
    does this rag smell like chloroform to you? boxofrain's Avatar
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    what camera are you using?

    Well, I am asking because the Wife just told me I HAD TO GET a macro camera for the plants.
    (I believe she likes the Utric's as much as I do)
    I am not a photographer and need a fairly simple unit, digital of course.
    Please mention both pro's and con's if you will.


    Thanks for any help folks
    "the memories of a man in his old age, are the deeds of a man in his prime"

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    Peatmoss's Avatar
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    I currently use a Canon SX30IS, it is quite a good camera but if you want macro photos you will have to crop them. For macro photography I really enjoy the manual focus feature and the screen on the back flips which is nice when you are really close up in something.

    It is also very easy to use but can take a bit to figure out. If you take photos you may also want to get a good editing program so you can crop/sharpen/increase the contrast on it.

    Here are some examples of some macros:

    U. sandersonii


    D. venusta

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    MICKEY's Avatar
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    talk to brie she is the expert

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    mass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MICKEY View Post
    talk to brie she is the expert
    I second that motion..

    But as far as what I'm using.
    Canon Powershot G3
    Opteka 52mm lens adapter
    Opteka 52mm to 52mm lens extension ring
    Opteka 52mm 10x macro lens

    Cons: Lot of individual pieces for using custom lenses. But hey, that could be perfectly normal. I'm still a photography noob.

    Pros: Awesome pics for the cost. Just my opinion on both points..

    Last edited by mass; 11-12-2011 at 05:01 PM.

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    does this rag smell like chloroform to you? boxofrain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MICKEY View Post
    talk to brie she is the expert
    I don't wanna bother her....but I hope she replies here.......
    "the memories of a man in his old age, are the deeds of a man in his prime"

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    mass's Avatar
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    I revised my post just for you buddy.

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    Devon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mass View Post
    I second that motion..
    Third.

    My canon PowerShot S3 IS was really good for macros, and isn't in the 1000's range for money.

    Here's an old example shot:



    ---------- Post added at 07:04 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:03 PM ----------

    Nice macro, Mass.

  8. #8
    Kyle's Avatar
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    I'm using a Canon T1i (so is Brie). I've used the kit lens for quite a while which is a nice lens, but won't give you "true" macro. I recently picked up a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM, which is a true macro lens, but is also quite pricey.

    It really comes down to how much money you're comfortable spending and whether or not "true" macrophotography is what you're after, which you probably aren't. True macro requires a lens with a magnification ratio of 1:1, meaning an object that is, say, 1/4 inch wide will form an image on the sensor that is 1/4 inch wide. Most lenses are more along the lines of 1:4 or 1:3, as far as I know.

    If you just want "closeup" photos (which a lot of people call macro photos), a lot of PnS (Point n' Shoot) cameras will do you just fine for between $200-$400, depending on how nice a camera you want. If you really want extreme closeup, get a PnS and a few lens adapters, like mass has. That'll give you great results, as his example demonstrates. And probably one of the better "bangs for your buck."

    If you really want a DSLR (one of the fancier ones, not a PnS; although they do have a full auto mode - largely a waste of money to buy a DSLR and use full auto, though...), you can go ahead and get one and simply use magnification filters such as these (which you can see are quite inexpensive), and they will often give you some nice magnification ratios at the cost of image quality. Most if not all of those will give you pretty bad distortion everywhere but the exact center of the image, kind of a fisheye effect.

    Yet another option, if you do want a DSLR, is to just use the kit lens with an extension tube. An extension tube is pretty straight-forward, it's just a tube that goes between the lens and the body, allowing you to get your lens closer to the subject while maintaining focus. This is an excellent option, and again pretty cheap, like this set. The drawback of these is that you'll be required to have much longer exposures. Also, unless you get a more expensive, nicer set, you also lose autofocus and aperture control. Tubes can be stacked, as well, to get you extremely close to the subject.

    Tubes and filters can also be used in combination. That's a good bit of versatility for $20.

    I do have to highly recommend a DSLR, just because I recently made the switch (... like... a year ago? Something like that) and never looked back. The amount of control is incredible, and image quality is definitely noticeable. Just keep in mind, if you've never used a DSLR (which I hadn't), it can be a pretty steep learning curve. But photography, even on the amateur level, can really be a blast, which is why I recommend a DSLR. Gets you more... "into" your pictures, more invested.

    Whatever you do, good luck. Macro and closeup photography is probably my favorite. It allows you to see so much that you just wouldn't be able to with the naked eye.

    Hope all that helped some. O_O


    EDIT: Figure I should mention one last thing. I can't recommend Canon highly enough. I don't have a ton of experience with cameras, but the few I've extensively used have been Canons and they're wonderful, wonderful cameras. And if you get a Canon PnS, there's a good chance you can use CHDK, which is a firmware hack for Canons PnSs that will give you a ton of extra control over your camera.

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