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Thread: What's So Great About "Pure Species"?

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    What's So Great About "Pure Species"?

    ...and why are hybrids / crosses considered inferior? These are crosses and I think they are beautiful:

    S. 'Dana's Delight'

    P. gypsicola x kohres

    S. 'Fledgeling'

    S. 'Leah Wilkerson'

    S. 'Leah Wilkerson'

    S. 'Hurricane Creek White'

    S. 'Schnell's Ghost'

    D. pulchella x occidentalis

    D. omissa x pulchella

    P. 'sethos'

    P. 'John Rizzi'

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    sarracenia lover dionae's Avatar
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    I think its a preference thing. I prefer hybrids. I like purpurea and flava hybrids the most. Its just something about the uniqueness of a hybrid that attracts me to them.

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Hybrids have to come from somewhere
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
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    ooooo....you threw out the bait, and you knew i would bite.

    hahaha lol. from a cultivation standpoint, yes, i would agree very much that it is a matter of preference. if you want robust, hardy plants with extra color and pazazz, for sure hybrids are the way to go.

    from a conservation standpoint is where i begin to give priority more to species. however, this really depends on the frequency and feasibility of obtaining seed. in the case of sarracenia, flowers reliably come up every year and are monecious, so the event to create pure species seed is so frequent, i dont mind hybridizing these plants at all. however, if you contrast that with nepenthes, which have an unknown flowering frequency and are dioecious, the event to create pure species is much rarer to come across. so, in my opinion, priority to make species seed holds higher than making hybrids and should be sought after before choosing to make hybrids. this is good in the long run, as it will ensure redundancies and prevent extra pressure on existing wild populations. (how many clone lines of nepenthes do we know of that have been discontinued or lost?)

    of course, if you happen to have two nepenthes in flower which happen to be complimentary, different species, and cant find their same species counterparts, it would make sense to cross them and make seed.

    -ok. end my little shpeel.

    i really like the dana's delight. and Leah's flowering, during this time of the year? figured the cold would have killed the flowers by now.
    Last edited by amphirion; 12-23-2011 at 05:35 PM.
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
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    LeafKirby's Avatar
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    Everyone has their own fetish.
    Formerly known as WaterKirby.

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    Natalie's Avatar
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    I didn't know there was a stigma against carnivorous plant hybrids like there is in other hobbies (cichlids, snakes, etc). I personally don't have a problem with hybrids as long as they are labeled as such... For example, someone selling a plant that was 75% Sarracenia minor and 25% S. alata as pure S. minor would be extremely poor taste, even if the plant looked identical to pure S. minor. But as long as they are labeled correctly, I see no problem, especially since even complex Sarracenia hybrids occur naturally in the wild. Many of the most beautiful sarrs I've seen have been hybrids. Here's one of my own I'm pretty fond of - Sarracenia 'Lamentations' ([flava maxima leucophylla] minor). I love the combination of the magenta with areolae on top and pinstripes on the bottom, I can't wait to see when it puts out some real adult pitchers.



    I still love pure species, and in fact my S. alata "black tube" is probably the plant I'm most anxious to see come springtime.
    Last edited by Natalie; 11-30-2011 at 11:44 AM.

  7. #7
    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
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    @Natalie: what you said probably does have a grain of truth...i come from a tropical fish background, very fond of cichlids, so im sure my biases may have originated from there.
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
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    sarracenia lover dionae's Avatar
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    Thats beautiful Natalie.

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