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Thread: DIY LED plant light project

  1. #9
    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    SX,

    The LED's you selected have a maximum current flow of 1500ma... I would look for an adjustable constant current driver that could at least provide 1000ma.
    Im having a hard time finding the term "constand current" in any of the descriptions.... you might want to contact their tech question email and talk to them. I just dont know.

    I would recommend that you also give Luxeon a look..
    http://www.luxeonstar.com/

    Av

  2. #10
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    I use a professional LED grow light, which has a combination of 660nm red, 615nm orange, 455nm blue and 3700K warm white, in a ratio of 3:1:1:1.

    You might want to reconsider the wavelength of the red LED, as 630nm is a little low on the chlorophyll absorption band: http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/e24/3.htm. 660nm might be a better choice.

    Whilst I can see certain benefits in choosing a high CRI white light, in that it should give a spectral distribution, one must consider that some of the light output will be of little or no use to the plant, as it is simply reflected, thus is wasted energy: http://www.botany.uwc.ac.za/ecotree/...s/spectrum.htm.
    Last edited by mobile; 10-07-2012 at 05:43 AM.

  3. #11
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    True, but what part is not needed?.... and aesthetically, the plant will not look "normal" to the human eye otherwise.

    If we start looking at the needs of accessory pigments the spectral distribution becomes much more complex


    In addition to the need of preventing botrytis sporation or facilitating trichoderma sporation...

    and we are back to ford vs. chevy, harley vs. honda, M16 vs. AK47, excellent arguments from both sides.

    no one ring to rule them all
    Last edited by Av8tor1; 10-07-2012 at 06:10 AM.

  4. #12
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    I've tried several white LED lamps and to be honest I have not had good growth results from any of them. This is not to say that certain white LEDs won't work, but I've yet to find which ones. As as example, I had my U. campbelliana under a Philips (Cree) LED lamp and growth rate was glacial. I later moved it under the aforementioned hybrid 3:1:1:1 lamp and the growth rate is very good. If you want white light then unless you are trying to achieve high wattage density you might be better off using fluorescent lamps, which use phosphors to produce white light in much the same way as white LEDs do, but using cheaper technology.

    The 3:1:1:1 LED lamp I use has white light in it, so that helps with the aesthetics. Though there is still an obvious purple hue it is much less noticeable than if using traditional red:blue only grow lamps.

  5. #13
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    If I was going to build one using today's technology....

    I would use High CRI 4100-5000k Whites with supplimental red and blue as needed. I would also use dimmable driver circuits.
    We can grow great looking plants with white fluorescent bulbs, I see no reason why LED's cant do same all things being equal...

    I just dont think their price is competitive yet compared to T5's...
    Last edited by Av8tor1; 10-07-2012 at 11:35 AM.

  6. #14
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    One of the big advantages of LEDs over fluorescents is they give the grower more opportunity to pick particular wavelengths attuned to the plants requirements. Fluorescents indeed do produce good results, but there can be quite a lot of waste energy in terms of plants requirements. One of the 'tricks' that light manufacturers can use to make lamps look brighter is to boost the green output, which the human eye is most sensitive to - but not too useful for plants.

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    True.... but you have to be careful in culling a certain wavelength. Research done by NASA for the International Space Station showed that green is important for canopy penetration. It also prevented the plant from dropping their lower leaves...

    Their research also showed that what one plant needs can be very different than what another plant needs.... sometimes these differences were rather dramatic.

  8. #16
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    A little dated, but still a good lecture on the subject
    http://bluegrasscarnivores.com/research1/ledmov.mov

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