User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 17 to 22 of 22

Thread: Are these really carnivorous?

  1. #17
    Peatmoss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,192
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Actually the bladders and forks are modified stolons...

    I believe that the Stylidium species I showed you kept its leaves all its live, but I'm not certain.
    <Av8tor1> as big as peat is, the bear runs not him

    Big Boss, Founder, and Major Cheese of the Canadian Association for the Cultivation of Carnivorous Plants... Ask if you want to join, I'm the only member...

  2. #18
    Keith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    602
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    and for my 2 cents: Flowers and scapes are just modified leaves anyway, before there were flowers there were only leaves, or so the botany prof. loved to preach. And he would be extremely pleased if he knew I mentioned that potatos are not a root, but a stem lol. I should print out this post and see if he gives extra credit for remembering useless information.
    My Grow/Want Lists
    -The horticulturalist formerly known as Shortbus-

  3. #19
    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area, US
    Posts
    3,498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Peatmoss View Post
    Actually the bladders and forks are modified stolons...

    I believe that the Stylidium species I showed you kept its leaves all its live, but I'm not certain.
    lolz. bladders and forks grow off the stolons, and not part of the stolon themselves. they are modified leaves last time i checked.

    for utricularia:
    "The numerous small bladders are modified hollow leaves with sensitive bristles on "trap door" entrances." http://www.msb.unm.edu/herbarium/nmplants.html

    for genlisea:
    "It has no true roots and instead has highly modified subterranean leaves that act as the carnivorous trapping mechanism" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genlisea_margaretae

    @shortbus: yes, semantics, semantics
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
    +petiolaris drosera going dormant?
    +picture thread

  4. #20
    JMN16150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Lathrop, CA
    Posts
    333
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks a lot, guys!
    And yes, lowii has transitioned to getting most of it's nutrients from tree shrew droppings, so it is at most minimally carnivorous in the wild (as with N. ampularia, getting most its nutrients from falling leaves). That doesn't mean it's not frickin' awesome!
    The video on Youtube that I saw was 'The private life of plants', narrated by David Attenborough(I think I spelled it right...), it didn't say anything about it eating bugs. It did say that this lshrew licks the nectar and that people believe that the nectar encourages #2ing. That explains why N. Lowii upper pitchers look like toilets Richjam1896, I didn't know that Nep. Ampularia gets its nutrients from leaves.
    Huh. Go figure. Learn something new every day!
    I guess you do!

    Say, has anyone used their finger to activate the flower? It looks like it would hurt

  5. #21
    richjam1986's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah. U.S.A.
    Posts
    836
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by amphirion View Post
    Even if flowerstalks of stelidium are capable of digesting insects, I still do not consider it carnivorous--because it should be the leaves of the plant should be responsible for attraction and capture of insects. Cephalotus, dionaea, drosera, sarracenia, heliamphora, darlingtonia, pinguicula, drosophyllun, utricularia, Byblis, and to some extent, roridula and brochinnia, have all modified their LEAVES to capture prey. Flowerstalks are not leaves, and not the main constituent of a plant. Therefore, eh....

    I'll leave my thoughts at that.
    I don't see why what part of the plant captures insects is relevant. The point is, THE PLANT captures and digests insects
    Da' mishu
    Provo, Utah.

    My Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...29#post1089429

  6. #22
    J NewspaperFort's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Willamette Valley
    Posts
    364
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Say, has anyone used their finger to activate the flower? It looks like it would hurt
    i had the pleasure of watching a wandering fly visit several flowers on my stylidium debile, and it triggered more than one pollen shot. i couldnt get my camera out in time before it took off, likely in search of a plant that didnt attack it ;] but it was very neat to watch indeed. and it had a much better firing rate than when i attempt to stimulate the reaction myself

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •