User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 11

Thread: Cinamon and it's duties? Is it harmful to utrics?

  1. #1
    JMN16150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Lathrop, CA
    Posts
    333
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cinamon and it's duties? Is it harmful to utrics?

    Does cinnamon really work as a fungicide? If it does, would it hurt utricularias?
    Thanks People!

  2. #2
    scottychaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western New York, USA
    Posts
    2,970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It doesn't work, its a myth, it has been debunked many times.
    I tested it myself personally one winter, used fresh cinnamon..
    it does nothing.

    Scot

  3. #3
    What is and what should never be Crissytal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hmm, I've always had good luck with cinnamon. When I use it, I don't get mold or fungus. When I don't use it, the mold is so thick the seeds can't be seen. I've used it many times when stratifying seeds in the fridge. It's guaranteed to mold if I don't use anything. I prefer cinnamon over a fungicide...especially in the fridge with food. I've recently used it sprinkled on some Nepenthes seeds, so far so good. Perhaps this goes back to what works for one in one's conditions might not work for another. It's cheap, and I'd say it's worth a try.

    JMN16150 to answer your question, it will not harm your Utrics.
    Where do we go when we just don't know,
    And how do we relight the flame when it's cold?
    Why do we dream when our thoughts mean nothing,
    And when will we learn to control?
    --Godsmack

  4. #4
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The role of Cinnamon as a fungicide is highly exaggerated. If you want a reliable, effective suppressor of fungal pathogens, use a real fungicide, like one of the azole family of fungicides. They are very effective and are low-hazard chemicals in terms of handling precautions and environmental impact. It cannot be overstated: read and follow the directions!

  5. #5
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  6. #6
    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,395
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Been a while, but I thought I read somewhere that the antifungal/bacteria properties of cinnamon are not actually due to the cinnamon itself, but rather the preservatives with which cin. is treated.



    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



  7. #7
    JMN16150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Lathrop, CA
    Posts
    333
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks guys! I asked this because there are tiny white mushrooms popping up all over the place in one pot with my u. longifolia, no harm done to the longifolia. I don't want to repot it because of its bladders or stolons might be damaged (Utrics are hard to come by):/

    Yay! Earth didn't end

  8. #8
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yay! Earth didn't end
    It wasn't supposed to. It was just the end of one of their cycles and a new one began.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •