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Thread: cp's glow blue to attract prey

  1. #9
    zesty. BioZest's Avatar
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    Fluorescence usually refers to the quality of a material which emits visible light when exposed to UV light. In a more general sense it is a material which absorbs light and emits light, usually with a lower wavelength (it has less energy). I don't think it has much to do with the reflection. The article isn't very clear on weather it fluoresces UV light or visible spectrum light.

    I'm not an expert on this so correct me if I'm wrong.



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    zesty. BioZest's Avatar
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    Ok. I typed the last post while you (richjam) were typing your last one. I read the article and it said:

    "On excitation at 366 nm, N. khasiana peristome 3:1 CHCl3–MeOH extract and its two major blue bands showed strong fluorescence emissions at 430–480 nm"

    So basically when the N. khasiana peristome is exposed to the UV light at the wavelength of 366, it
    fluoresces wavelengths 430-480 nm which is violet up to blue in visible light.

    If you get a black light that emits the wavelength 366, the plants listed in the abstract will glow blue.

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    Lucky Greenhorn Lil Stinkpot's Avatar
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    *Lil Stinkpot looks around for her four foot blacklight.*
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    richjam1986's Avatar
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    Well, I had my doubts, but here's proof that it works!

    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...38#post1112738
    Da' mishu
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    My Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...29#post1089429

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    This is really cool! Many flowers have been known to reflect UV in a way that it directs a path for pollinators, which can see the patterns. I guess this is the same method, except the bugs meet a much different fate in this situation.

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    I don't think any of these plants are fluorescing though, I think they are just being illuminated by the black light. Expanding on what good said above me, the idea that plants, flowers, etc "fluoresce" when exposed to UV light is not a new concept. This is just the first time they've done it on CP's from what I can tell. We learned about this extensively in my entymology class when learning about pollinator attraction to flowers. Many insects do not see much of the visible light spectrum but are able to see UV light if I recall correctly. Hence, as the insect flies it sees this "glowing" plant and is like hey that looks like a good place to look for food/pollen/whatever and then falls into the trap. As for the fact that the plants seem to glow under blacklights... I think that is more of the same kind of reaction you see when you put fluorescent paint under a black light not what the article is referring to. These are just my opinions and interpretation of the article though and I could be completely wrong. Please someone write up a paper and prove me wrong cause glowing CP's would be pretty awesome
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    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcmcnair View Post
    I don't think any of these plants are fluorescing though, I think they are just being illuminated by the black light. Expanding on what good said above me, the idea that plants, flowers, etc "fluoresce" when exposed to UV light is not a new concept. This is just the first time they've done it on CP's from what I can tell. We learned about this extensively in my entymology class when learning about pollinator attraction to flowers. Many insects do not see much of the visible light spectrum but are able to see UV light if I recall correctly. Hence, as the insect flies it sees this "glowing" plant and is like hey that looks like a good place to look for food/pollen/whatever and then falls into the trap. As for the fact that the plants seem to glow under blacklights... I think that is more of the same kind of reaction you see when you put fluorescent paint under a black light not what the article is referring to. These are just my opinions and interpretation of the article though and I could be completely wrong. Please someone write up a paper and prove me wrong cause glowing CP's would be pretty awesome
    Im bringing my small blacklight down to Virginia with me this weekend so we can test it on Graham's nepenthes.

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    zesty. BioZest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcmcnair View Post
    I don't think any of these plants are fluorescing though, I think they are just being illuminated by the black light. Expanding on what good said above me, the idea that plants, flowers, etc "fluoresce" when exposed to UV light is not a new concept. This is just the first time they've done it on CP's from what I can tell. We learned about this extensively in my entymology class when learning about pollinator attraction to flowers. Many insects do not see much of the visible light spectrum but are able to see UV light if I recall correctly. Hence, as the insect flies it sees this "glowing" plant and is like hey that looks like a good place to look for food/pollen/whatever and then falls into the trap. As for the fact that the plants seem to glow under blacklights... I think that is more of the same kind of reaction you see when you put fluorescent paint under a black light not what the article is referring to. These are just my opinions and interpretation of the article though and I could be completely wrong. Please someone write up a paper and prove me wrong cause glowing CP's would be pretty awesome
    They are fluorescing. It says this in the abstract of the paper here:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...709.x/abstract. I also said stuff about it in the last post of page #1. If the plants were just being illuminated by the backlight, you wouldn't be able to see any light because humans can't see the UV which would be reflecting off the plant.

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