User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 11 of 11

Thread: Looking at Sphagnum Wrong?

  1. #9

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    just cuz sphagnum grows well alongside CPs doesnt mean tha it requires the same exact soil/water conditions.

  2. #10
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Ambanja View Post
    Sphagnum will take over lakes, bogs, and nutrient rich environments, but I think you are forgetting the extreme timetable for this kind of growth. It starts from spores reaching an ideal environment and over time it slowly spreads outward making its mat (and with it it's own micro environment), some spots may be hundreds and others thousands of years old.
    The timetable isn't really a factor in the question I'm trying to ask... Unless you're meaning to say that the certain population evolves over time with the more hardy spores growing into moss that can handle the conditions better and over time it creates a strain of that species that is well adapted to that nutrient-rich environment. It would probably work the same the other way around for nutrient-poor-liking species of Sphagnum.

    Quote Originally Posted by richjam1986 View Post
    I see people making a couple assumptions here that probably shouldn't be made: How do you know that the lake was high in dissolved mineral, or that it is high in nutrients (as well as the sphagnum seen in the park)? Soil color and "muddiness" doesn't indicate dissolved mineral content or nutritional richness of the soil. So yes, it would be good to bring some water and soil tests.

    Of course, Sphagnum needs nutrients too, and will often benefit from light application of fertilizer in cultivation; so why wouldn't it be able to live in slightly more fertile soils in the wild?

    Last thought: Conditions in cultivation and in the wild are VERY different. If you consistently add slightly too many nutrients and minerals to a plant in cultivation, they can build up relatively quickly until they are too much for the plant to handle. In the wild, even in more mineral or nutrient rich areas, you have water circulation happening on a scale that is very difficult to imitate in cultivation, and rain is frequently flushing the soil of excess nutrients and minerals. Direct comparison between cultivation and the wild often doesn't work, because it is very difficult to recreate conditions found in the wild.
    Yup, I'm assuming it for a couple of reasons, but they aren't strong arguments. I'll test the water next time (so a year from now at most)... There's tons of fish living in there and there's lots of aquatic plant life, so the fish must produce some nutrients, especially when they die -- since the lake isn't fished. Tons of lilies everywhere and those need nutrients to grow and flower yearly.

    Quote Originally Posted by mylesG View Post
    just cuz sphagnum grows well alongside CPs doesnt mean tha it requires the same exact soil/water conditions.
    Exactly my point for making this topic! That's EXACTLY what I had in my head while writing this, just didn't have the simple words for it lol. I'm saying that maybe people are assuming so, as I did, and it can actually take more minerals. Not all species though. I'm sure out of thousands of species around the world that at least one will die quickly from high mineral concentrations and another may starve from nutrients over a few years and die back.

  3. #11
    richjam1986's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah. U.S.A.
    Posts
    836
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post

    Yup, I'm assuming it for a couple of reasons, but they aren't strong arguments. I'll test the water next time (so a year from now at most)... There's tons of fish living in there and there's lots of aquatic plant life, so the fish must produce some nutrients, especially when they die -- since the lake isn't fished. Tons of lilies everywhere and those need nutrients to grow and flower yearly.

    I see where you are coming from, but you seem to be under another false assumption: That Sphagnum and CP's live in nutritionally sterile environments. Of course, it depends on the plants and the habitat we are talking about, and some CP's live in less nutrient rich environments than others, but generally speaking, CP's (and Sphagnum) live in nutrient deficient habitats, not habitats where nutrients are absent.

    As an example, one problem occurring in many U.S. carnivorous plant habitats is fire suppression, which allows larger trees and shrubs to overgrow the bogs. I have visited several of these sites for CP's in Virginia, and assisted in clearing the shrubs and trees that would otherwise overgrow the CP's and other bog plants. Obviously there are enough nutrients in the bog to support growth of trees and many other plants, but CP's grow there too. The lake habitat you describe and show in your video in no way strikes me as unsuitable for CP's or Sphagnum (except perhaps that it is too shaded for most CP's?). And remember, things work much differently in nature than they do in cultivation.

    Edit: Of course the fish produce nutrients, as well as many other biological processes occurring in the lake. This happens in every habitat from any number of sources. But "some" nutrients doesn't make the habitat unsuitable, and in proper levels these nutrients are even necessary.
    Last edited by richjam1986; 07-08-2013 at 10:15 PM.
    Da' mishu
    Provo, Utah.

    My Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...29#post1089429

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •