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Thread: Axelrod's CP adventures

  1. #49
    Axelrod12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    First plant is a Sarracenia rhizome with a dismal amount of roots. Second's a weed.
    If that's the case should I be assuming my LFS isn't from New Zealand seeing that sarracenia are North American plants?

    Quote Originally Posted by bluemax View Post
    The easiest thing to do is to allow a bit more of an opening to the outside. A few very small holes might do it, maybe poked with a needle. You can deter fungus with a suspension of cinnamon in water applied with an eye dropper directly to the spots needed. I've never seen it hurt a plant and it is surprisingly effective.

    I rarely if ever do anything to fight blue green algae. As long as it doesn't actually cover the plants it shouldn't do any harm. It's ugly as sin, tho'. I have read that a very light application of hydrogen peroxide will kill it but this could be hard on plants as well. Rinsing your media before using it will minimize bga growth. I don't usually see it on sphagnum.

    'Wishing you success.
    Thanks, I'm gonna let the BGA be and see if a few holes fixes the mold issue. I'll keep that cinnamon in mind though.

  2. #50
    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
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    The first mystery plant does look like a Sarracenia, but only time will tell. I am sure your moss is from NZ if it says so on the bag or from the manufacturer. Maybe it ended up in there during a recent potting adventure you had? I know most folks say that Sarrs have to stay really wet, but I have seen even small chunks of rhizome dry our for quite a while then come back to life. Don't get me wrong: they aren't tulip bulbs.

    I can vouch for the effects of cinnamon. It is one handy tool in the orchid bizz.
    Corey Bennett

    My cultivated vegetation, carnivorous and otherwise...

    Formerly cbennett4041

  3. #51
    Axelrod12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbennett4041 View Post
    The first mystery plant does look like a Sarracenia, but only time will tell. I am sure your moss is from NZ if it says so on the bag or from the manufacturer. Maybe it ended up in there during a recent potting adventure you had? I know most folks say that Sarrs have to stay really wet, but I have seen even small chunks of rhizome dry our for quite a while then come back to life. Don't get me wrong: they aren't tulip bulbs.

    I can vouch for the effects of cinnamon. It is one handy tool in the orchid bizz.
    I didn't exactly get the moss from a manufacturer or traceable source. I'm a little unclear on the rules with posting names still but lets just say its more of a secondhand re-seller that I bought it from.

    There was moss from two sources in the bag. Both said it was NZ.
    I don't really know where the rhizome could've come from unless it snuck it from a seller, one seller was a nursery so it's not too unlikely I guess.

    Anyways I sowed most of my Sarracenia seeds after they were stratifying in the fridge for 5 weeks. I tried to leave open spots in the tray in between seeds just in case a couple decided to jump over or something.


  4. #52
    Axelrod12's Avatar
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    Question now. I want to set up a little mini terrarium type deal in my office at work. No windows just standard office lighting of a few t8s up in the ceiling. I'm thinking a odd shaped bowl or something to keep the humidity up. I was also thinking a ping or two of some sort but that is up for debate. My questions I guess are what is the lowest light requiring small easy plants I could get away with and what sort of discrete lighting could I use to support them?

    There are some 3w led clip on lights I've seen used for planted aquaria bowls, dunno if one would be enough though. I don't exactly want a large brooder lamp clipped on anywhere but I guess the largest least discrete I could do is maybe a desk lamp with a cfl.

  5. #53
    Axelrod12's Avatar
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    One of my plants isn't really growing so great anymore. One of my D. capensis 'red' hasn't been putting out much new growth and is starting to look rather sparse. The other Drosera in the terrarium are still growing well. Actually the aliciae is growing rather slow as well but it has always been a little more sluggish than the others. Humidity is usually around 70-85% and temp around 70-83F or so depending on how long the lights have been on. 10g terrarium with 2x24w t5ho about 6" from the plants, 12-14 hour photoperiod. The only thing that changed recently is I added some reflective insulation on 3 sides to help maximize the light. Any ideas what may be causing the plant to not do so great?

    Last edited by Axelrod12; 02-27-2014 at 10:49 PM.

  6. #54
    Axelrod12's Avatar
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    I'm thinking maybe temperature. I've been monitoring it a bit more and it has dropped down to 65F at night. 82F seems to be around the hottest it gets. I thought capensis could tolerate this but maybe the swings are affecting it?

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    Hmm, I grow capensis year round in my backyard where there can be temperature swings of 30 degrees sometimes and it still does fine. Could there be pests on the plant?

  8. #56
    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
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    My experience with capensis suggests that these plants just go through swings like that. Mine go through periods of looking awesome and then sulking some. They usually perk up within a month or so. I know not what causes this, but if they don't perk up after a few months I repot them and that always does the trick: they look show room new within a couple weeks of repotting.

    *shrugs* May be there is just something about how I care for mine. Capensis are so bullet proof that I often become quite negligent in their care. None have died for me in a few years of growing, though. Not to suggest you are doing anything wrong. Rather, I am saying if they survive my lack of attention yours will probably perk up in no time with your attentiveness.

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