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Thread: An Indoor Pitcher Plant?

  1. #9
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    I'd say pretty much anything that naturally grows in your temperature range and doesn't get massive. I'd also suggest ventrata, but after two years, mine is half the length of my greenhouse and grows wall to wall width-wise.

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    I have a couple N.campanulata X ventricosa, the main plant is in my greenhouse but I trialed a cutting here at uni and it is happy, plus this hybrid is tolerant of very low light levels and still pitchers, it gets 40-50% humidity and no full sun just bright light and is happy, my main plant is a few years old and is only 25cm diameter and 10cm tall, has several basals and nice 14cm tall traps with the open mouth of a campanulata, so maybe if you can find another camp hybrid, but the pure species will suffer in low humidity, and they also like high light levels.
    Maxima Mini is another that stays small and tolerates low humidity, or ventricosa, they bush up well when pruned, are compact and small (compared to others) tolerate low humidity, are cheap and are happy in the shade, they are also happy here in a tropical climate yet they are an intermediate/highlander.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    While the temperature range of an indoor environment might be tolerable to a warm growing species like N. campanulata, low humidity will probably prevent the species from performing well.

    To the OP: N. Ventrata or N. Miranda would be better choices for you, but be aware that if you have really low humidity in the house, it can prevent any Nepenthes from forming pitchers. I performed a test in Summer 2012 where I placed a couple of my easiest N. maxima hybrids outdoors from June to early October, and in our dry (30%) air the plants stopped producing pitchers completely, even though all other climate conditions was ideal. They resumed pitchering only once they were returned to the humid greenhouse environment in mid-October. I think many people overlook the importance of humidity as a significant factor in the production of pitchers, and there is a point at which the dryness factor will prevent pitcher formation. It would be a good idea to measure the relative humidity in your house over a period of several days, both day and night readings, to determine exactly how dry your house is before making any choices.
    I can attest to this. My alata has lived over 10 years but has formed almost no pitchers because I leave it outside where humidity is low. If the humidity of your house is too low maybe you could get a humidifier.

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    OscarW's Avatar
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    I have robcantely and cephalotus both pitcher and growing very healthy on my sunny windowsill. Humidity is very low, yesterday was only 5%.

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    NatchGreyes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    While the temperature range of an indoor environment might be tolerable to a warm growing species like N. campanulata, low humidity will probably prevent the species from performing well.

    To the OP: N. Ventrata or N. Miranda would be better choices for you, but be aware that if you have really low humidity in the house, it can prevent any Nepenthes from forming pitchers. I performed a test in Summer 2012 where I placed a couple of my easiest N. maxima hybrids outdoors from June to early October, and in our dry (30%) air the plants stopped producing pitchers completely, even though all other climate conditions was ideal. They resumed pitchering only once they were returned to the humid greenhouse environment in mid-October. I think many people overlook the importance of humidity as a significant factor in the production of pitchers, and there is a point at which the dryness factor will prevent pitcher formation. It would be a good idea to measure the relative humidity in your house over a period of several days, both day and night readings, to determine exactly how dry your house is before making any choices.
    Thirding this, and will state that, as far as Neps go, I'd suggest: x ventrata, alata (or its variants), ventricosa, sanguinea ('orange' is probably the most common variety), or, really, most things in the Intermediate range of this chart and widely available should do okay. However, you'll have to do some research to make sure that it'll stay small, otherwise, you'll be making cuttings all the time.

  6. #14
    Favian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OscarW View Post
    I have robcantely and cephalotus both pitcher and growing very healthy on my sunny windowsill. Humidity is very low, yesterday was only 5%.
    I too, was able to grow both of these plants indoors on windowsill. I never had a problem with these two forming pitchers under low humidity. But n. robcantleyi gets huge, so that would not work.
    Your momma!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    I'd say pretty much anything that naturally grows in your temperature range and doesn't get massive. I'd also suggest ventrata, but after two years, mine is half the length of my greenhouse and grows wall to wall width-wise.
    I feel the need to amend that statement:

    "anything that naturally grows in your INDOOR temperature range!"

    your outside climate is utterly irrelevant to this discussion..
    carry on.
    Scot

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    Thank you all, so many smart and thought out replies!
    This gives me a lot to think about now. But I'm sure there is a perfect one for me.
    Thanks Jcal, but it looks as thought it gets huge!

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