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Thread: Carnivorous Plant Bonsai?

  1. #17

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    Adelea, if you were in the USA, I would totally offer to buy or trade you for that dwarfed N.mirabilis with its tiny little traps! Please post photos of that adorable lil bug eater!

    Dragon, Do you grow bonsai? If so I want to see photos of that too! I didn't know that kusamono & shitakusa were dwarfed plants. Aren't they just plants that are selected for their appropriate (small) size?

    And . . . Orchid Lovers, check this out:
    Orchids as Bonsai (or would this be kusamono or shitakusa?) : http://www.aos.org/Default.aspx?id=431

  2. #18

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    I'm going back home to check on my greenhouse in a few days, I'll grab a few pics of the mirabilis, including one with it next to its largest sibling.

  3. #19

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    Also there are plenty of minute orchids that would make nice miniature features with a bonsai

  4. #20
    Confused Magikarp fdfederation's Avatar
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    @EdaxFlamma Nice

  5. #21
    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acro View Post
    Dragon, Do you grow bonsai?
    LOL I have played around with bonsai, Acro. But, alas! I found that I often lack the patience and vision to do well at it. Doesn't prevent me from being filled with awe and admiration for beautifully bonsai'ed trees though! Someday, perhaps, I will put forth the effort to try again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Acro View Post
    I didn't know that kusamono & shitakusa were dwarfed plants. Aren't they just plants that are selected for their appropriate (small) size?
    There is very little dwarfing that can be done to many of the plants used, which is why they usually outgrow their usefulness in the work and need replaced. Take grasses, for instance. Even should you find a grass that naturally stays short, you still have the issue of it spreading beyond the space you wish it to take up -- and in the case of a smaller kusamono or shitakusa piece, there isn't a lot of space to start with. (Have you ever experienced the "joy" of trying to keep grass from spreading from the lawn into a flowerbed or vegetable garden? Grass is a tenacious WEED.)

    You are quite correct that plants which naturally remain very small are the preferred material, but
    1) sometimes there are no minis that have the "look" one is going for;
    2) sometimes suitable minis are unavailable -- whether do to scarcity or simply far too expensive for what one can afford; and/or
    3) when all is said and done, plants grow ... whether up or spreading outwards.
    With plants like trees/shrubs that have a single main stem, root and branch pruning can be done. But how does one go about pruning a plant like a grass or fern (even a super short variety) that spreads outwards often by runners? And if you should desire to incorporate more than one species of plant (which is not uncommon in kusamono & shitakusa), how do you prevent one species from muscling out another in the long term? Generally speaking you can't. So at some point the piece needs to be dismantled and redone. (Which is not always a bad thing ... one tastes may change over time or a new plant or rock, et cetera may inspire one to do something different with the piece.)



    Quote Originally Posted by Acro View Post
    And . . . Orchid Lovers, check this out:
    Orchids as Bonsai (or would this be kusamono or shitakusa?) : http://www.aos.org/Default.aspx?id=431
    Hard to tell from the pictures, but I believe that the 1st and 3rd ones in the left hand column would be considered "saikei" -- miniature landscapes. The others could be used as shitakusa but I would suspect they would more likely be kusamono (centerpieces in their own right as opposed to as living décor to augment a bonsai display).
    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



  6. #22
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    I believe it can be done and I believe that Nepenthes are the best candidate. The reason I say so is much like EdaxFlamma, I had a ventricosa that I kept very stunted and had died back to the roots a few times. Eventually it ended up with a rosette that was smaller than when I purchased it two years earlier. You have to keep the Nepenthes hovering back and forth between periods of good environmental conditions and then also neglect or abuse. The only reason that I believe this is sort of like bonsai is because the pitchers on the plant start to take on an inherently mature look while still only being the size of a small seedling's. This is not the best picture, but this N. ventricosa was at least 4 years old at the time of this photo but maybe as old as 6 or 7.



    Also I have plants right now that are the exact diameter as when I received them two years ago. Their pitchers certainly look more mature than when I got the plants, yet they are still only the same size. I achieved this through a thoughtless amalgamation of intermittent neglect and abuse. Or maybe I suck at growing Nepenthes?

    Either way if I ever get property and a greenhouse I am going to devote at least one plant for bonsai purposes.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

  7. #23
    mcantrell's Avatar
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    I'm trying to remember the name, but there was a specific subtype of Bonsai that came into production after WW2. They weren't Bonsai, not exactly, they were more like Bonsai meets Bonseki. Instead of a single tree growing in miniature, they were micro-landscapes.

    Something similar could be done with Carnivorous Plants, I imagine. Take a 11" pot, give or take, use something like clay to partition it off slightly, and make a miniature bog or swamp with it.

    Edit: Found it. The term is Saikei.
    http://www.bonsaiprimer.com/saikei/saikei.html
    http://www.saikei.co.uk/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saikei

    Something like that could work with smaller CPs. Moss or suitable Utricularia for ground cover, with suitable Carnivorous plants.

  8. #24

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    Hi Folks:

    We did "bog bonsai" a number of years ago utilizing Atlantic white-cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides) as the confer on a hummock with dwarf Sarracenia purpurea, sphagnum, Drosera, and Utricularia. This combination mimics natural hummocks found primarily in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, but also other white cedar locations. Sarracenia purpurea can be replaced with S. rubra or S. psittacina dwarfs. This bonsai set-up is a good way to utlize Sarracenia "runts".

    Sincerely,

    Phil Sheridan, Ph.D.
    President and Director
    Meadowview Biological
    Research Station

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