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Thread: Carnivorous Plant Bonsai?

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    Carnivorous Plant Bonsai?

    Has anyone ever made a bonsai style planting using Carnivores?

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    zesty. BioZest's Avatar
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    If anyone has, I can't imagine what plant they would have used.

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Bonsai works best on woody plants, and to my knowledge there are no woody carnivores.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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    Drosophyllum and Nepenthes are both woody genera. I believe in The Savage Garden D'Amato included a nice photo of a Geoff Wong Drosophyllum in this blue pot that looked very much like a bonsai. I tried to find that pic but can't seem to with google images.

    On a small scale, with very old stem-forming D. capensis or carefully pruned Byblis, you might also have a shot. Since bonsai is all about appearance, you might be able to "fake" a forest planting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theplantman View Post
    Drosophyllum and Nepenthes are both woody genera. I believe in The Savage Garden D'Amato included a nice photo of a Geoff Wong Drosophyllum in this blue pot that looked very much like a bonsai. I tried to find that pic but can't seem to with google images.
    I know which picture you are talking about. I would love to see a close-up of that picture, since the plant in the picture looked so much like a pine tree that until I saw more pictures of Drosophyllum I thought they just looked like miniature pine trees.

    Roridula could work while it is young. It seems to be pretty woody. Or maybe you could try erect tuberous Drosera.
    Last edited by Tanukimo; 03-11-2014 at 11:48 AM. Reason: fixed quote

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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    This would be really difficult, if not impossible. Bonsai requires root pruning. Drosophyllum doesn't like being uprooted, so that's out of the question.

    Now, I have seen dwarf S. purpurea in North Carolina in bloom. The leaves were only 4" long and the flower sepals were only 2" wide. There were 2 of them.

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    Carnivorous plants can absolutely be used as bonsai. Bonsai style plantings are not restricted to trees alone. Bonsai can be made from herbaceous plants, grasses, mosses or rocks. Chinese Rock Plantings are a form of bonsai that is all about the placement of rocks; forming a symbol of mountains. These mountain scenes are sometimes left alone or are planted. In the book The Living Art Of Bonsai (Amy Liang), there are many photos of what she calls "herb bonsai". Not all the plants she uses are "herbs", in the sense of plants we cook with, but they represent many leafy and grass like plants. They are not made to look like tiny trees, but attention is given to their shape, visual balance and visual weight. Here is a good example: http://bonsaibark.com/wp-content/uploads/art8.jpg

    As for the photo in The Savage Garden, do you mean the Byblis liniflora on page 224?
    Also there are bonsai-ish plantings on pages 24 (the Darlingtonia and Sarracenia), and 177 (D. 'Triffida'). With a little tending, they could be called bonsai. Also, the pages I am referring to are from the revised edition of The Savage Garden.

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    Last edited by Acro; 03-11-2014 at 01:53 PM. Reason: Sent 2ce, whoops!

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