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Thread: New Canadian import regs?

  1. #9
    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Av8tor1 View Post
    So I guess Canadians can cross the border and personally bring in up to 50 "houseplants" for "personal use" without issue (assuming no species specific issues)
    That has been in play for a while now. A gent I know on a cacti/succ forum frequently will take plants over the border in either direction. If he is doing trades with US folks, he waits until he is visiting family in the US. He then brings his trade items with him over the border and mails them to the other person. That person, in turn, will have mailed their trade plants to his relatives' home. He then takes them with him back over the border when he returns to Canada.
    "Blessed are the cracked….
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  2. #10
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    This covers the situation of a US citizen passing through Canada from one US State to another (e.g. Alaska to one of the 48 states). Proof of no intent to remain in Canada is required by Canadian authorities. The plants are not to stay in Canada (inventory is checked entering and leaving):
    https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/det...ts/suggested/1

    4. Avoid taking items that are restricted or prohibited from entering Canada. For instance, household plants and dirt generally can enter Canada temporarily. However, under no circumstances can outdoor plants or firewood enter Canada.


    https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/det...ts/suggested/1
    Travelers bringing plants across the border into the US require a phytosanitary certificate. If 12 or less plants the plants are inspected by US Customs and Border Protection. If 13 or more the plants are inspected by the USDA/APHIS at the nearest Plant Protection Quarantine Inspection Station. Additional permits are required.

    Many plants may enter the United States from foreign countries, provided they meet certain entry requirements. Entry requirements vary by plant, but the following requirements universally apply:

    · If you bring back 12 or fewer articles of admissible plants that have no special restrictions, you do not need a permit. Special restrictions may include requirements such as a permit, post-entry quarantine, treatment, or ESA or CITES documentation.

    · Plants must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate from the country of origin showing that the plants meet entry requirements for the United States.

    · Plants should be bare rooted (no growing media attached to the roots).


    · You should perform a basic visual inspection of plants. Look for insects or sickly looking plant parts.

    · Wrap plants in damp newspaper or similar material to prevent them from drying out. Roots may be secured in a plastic bag.

    Twelve or fewer plants are inspected by CBP at the first port of entry. Thirteen or more plants will be inspected by APHIS personnel at the nearest Plant Inspection Station. If the inspector finds plant pests that could cause harm to other plants, or if the plants do not meet entry requirements, they will be refused entry. This means you must forfeit the plants, which will either be destroyed or returned to the country of origin.

    Travelers are advised to consult with their nearest APHIS PPQ Plant Inspection Station to determine the admissibility of propagative plant material (including live plants, bulbs, corms, cuttings, root crowns, seeds, etc.).

    You can learn more about admissibility and entry requirements for certain plants by calling Permit Services at (301) 851-2046 or toll-free at (877) 770-5990 or by email at Permits@aphis.usda.gov.
    Last edited by Not a Number; 03-24-2014 at 07:26 PM.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  3. #11
    sarracenia lover dionae's Avatar
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    If ever in doubt just call APHIS in Riverdale MD. Its the main office and theyre very nice and helpful people. They explain everything in laymens terms leaving nothing open for interpretation.

  4. #12

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    >So who is our official Canadian mule for NASC

    I vote for Carl Mazur

  5. #13
    Peatmoss's Avatar
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    Oy! I've done this!

    I brought quite a few plants back from the ICPS conference a while back. Didn't have any problems at the borders, but I had printed out the sheet showing the legalities involved and brought it with me.

    I didn't declare that I had the plants, but would've declared them had they asked if we had plants or animals.

    I wouldn't recommend importing any temperate CPs, as they're technically qualified as outdoor plants, but as far as I know, all tropical CPs are accepted as houseplants.

    For the record, it's also completely legal to send seeds to Canadians, although the reverse is illegal.
    <Av8tor1> as big as peat is, the bear runs not him

    Big Boss, Founder, and Major Cheese of the Canadian Association for the Cultivation of Carnivorous Plants... Ask if you want to join, I'm the only member...

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