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Thread: Carnivorous Paludarium HELP!

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    Carnivorous Paludarium HELP!

    Hello everyone,

    I feel it would be appropriate to firstly introduce myself before I explain my reasons behind joining this forum. My name is Alex from Yorkshire in the UK and although not new to keeping carnivorous plants, I am new to actually keeping them alive!

    I recently rekindled my love for carnivorous plants after reading a copy of 'The Savage Garden' by Peter D'amato and decided to create my own carnivorous plant terrarium. Although the advice in this book suggests keeping the plants in pots and watering via tray, I felt this method looks slightly sterile and have instead have chosen to design a more naturalistic Paludarium style container for a selection of Carnivores.

    Circumstances have led to myself obtaining a 30cmx30cmx30cm reptile vivarium to realise this project, within this there shall be a running/trickling water element, which leaves an area of 20cmx30cmx20cm for planting.

    Here comes the reason I joined the forum, my intended design shall create an environment with high humidity and little space; but I am still unsure what carnivorous plants could thrive in those conditions. My own research has led me to believe that the following plants would do well:
    Cephalotus follicularis (Albany Pitcher)
    Nepenthes 'Bloody Mary'
    Dionaea muscipula-Variety?

    All these plants would remain potted on a shelf made of eggcrate with gaps filled by Spagnum moss-saving me the the problem of having to make different substrate mixes!


    Overcrowded? Overambitious? Over the top?
    Please let me know!

    Any help from experienced terrarium builders/plantsmen would be greatly appreciated

    Thanks in advance

    Alex

    ps. I shall photograph the build process and upload to this thread as the project develops

  2. #2
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Naturalistic terrariums, vivariums and paludariums tend to work best if you use plants with similar conditional requirements. You chose a tropical Nepenthes from South East Asia, a semi temperate from Austraila and a temperate species from the US. Not all of those plants will do well long term in there due to the fact that they all need different environments. Try using plants with the same needs, you'll have much more success.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu138 View Post
    Naturalistic terrariums, vivariums and paludariums tend to work best if you use plants with similar conditional requirements. You chose a tropical Nepenthes from South East Asia, a semi temperate from Austraila and a temperate species from the US. Not all of those plants will do well long term in there due to the fact that they all need different environments. Try using plants with the same needs, you'll have much more success.
    This is where my plant knowledge lets me down-I'm restricted by the type of plants I can obtain from the internet and essentially plucked the ones that I visually like the best-not planning for the longterm.

    I am refusing to have to work with heating elements simply because this is a first paludariums I am attempting, so I am currently looking at plants from cooler climates-say North American Sarracenias, however, I dont want to restrict myself to one variety of plants. Any suggestions for suitable high humidity Drosera/Darlingtonia californica/Dionaea, or do they simply not exist and I'll have to work with the dreaded heatmat.

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Figure out how stable your temps will be year round and make your decision based upon that. If you can't provide a cool/cold dormancy, temperates like the Dionea will only live a few seasons. What aquatic residents are you considering for the water section?
    Last edited by SubRosa; 03-30-2014 at 09:45 AM.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
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    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Yea unless your setup is going to be experiencing a definitive dormancy period every winter Sarracenia and Dionaea will not thrive in the long run. I would suggest as a start some of the very easiest carnivores that are small. Such examples would be D. capensis, U. sandersonii, or any of the more vigorous Mexican Pinguicula. These sort of plants don't need as severe of a dormancy and stay quite small for a long time.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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    Quote Originally Posted by SubRosa View Post
    Figure out how stable your temps will be year round and make your decision based upon that. If you can't provide a cool/cold dormancy, temperates like the Dionea will only live a few seasons. What aquatic residents are you considering for the water section?
    I think that seems a sensible idea, completing the physical paludarium build and seeing what temps/humidity I have to work with. In terms of aquatic life, I dont think I'm going to actually include any due to the size of the tank and rather, make the plants the focus. Does that contradict the idea of a paludarium and really mean i'm essentially building a terrarium with a water feature?

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    I would prefer my plants to not have to have a dormancy period-through fear of them not returning! is this possible without using a heatmat? I suppose a microclimate would be established inside the viv, but kept in my room away from the window it's unlilkely to exceed room temp

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PieandPeas View Post
    I think that seems a sensible idea, completing the physical paludarium build and seeing what temps/humidity I have to work with. In terms of aquatic life, I dont think I'm going to actually include any due to the size of the tank and rather, make the plants the focus. Does that contradict the idea of a paludarium and really mean i'm essentially building a terrarium with a water feature?
    That would be my interpretation. My paludarium includes a permanent water section with fish, but it's also about 95cm square and 75cm high.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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