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Thread: proper name

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    jimmy uphwiz's Avatar
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    proper name

    Can someone help with the naming process .
    when there is a double x in the middle of the two parents.
    what does that indicate?
    Example wilkersons red x x flava cinnamon tube.

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    The double "X" would indicate that it's a hybrid with the second plant being itself a hybrid. In the case of your example where both plants are hybrids, Sarracenia x "Wilkerson's Red" x x flava "Cinnamon Tube", the first "X" in between the 2 plants involved signifies the cross at hand while the second "X" designates the second plant as also being a hybrid. A better way to write this one might be to leave "flava" out of the second description since the plant is a cross of 2 distinct flava varieties and just call it Sarracenia x "Wilkerson's Red" x x "Cinnamon Tube".

    Each plant on it's own would be:

    Sarracenia x "Wilkerson's Red"
    Sarracenia x "Cinnamon Tube"

    The 2 plants when bred together would then be Sarracenia x "Wilkerson's Red" x x "Cinnamon Tube"

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    Sashoke's Avatar
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    So in terms of Nepenthes, itd be like Ventrata xx Miranda, as opposed to ventricosa x maxima?
    ~Burgeoning connoisseur of all things ventricosa or otherwise tubby.~

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    It would be x ventrata x x 'Miranda'. Or to make it simpler you can use parentheses for the latter, x ventrata x (x 'Miranda'). Or in the case of the first and the latter, since at least one is a cultivar there is no need for the first x, so 'Wilkerson's Red' x (x "Cinnamon Tube") or x ventrata x 'Miranda'
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    It basically indicates that someone does not yet know how to correctly write plant names. There may have, at one time, been an option to use an X, to simply indicate that a plant was of hybrid origins, that has not been a valid option with horticultural names, for at least several decades.

    In botany, sometimes plants are named and published, then it is later discovered that they are naturally occurring wild hybrids. When that happens, an "X" is inserted after the Genus name and before the specific epithet, to indicate that the plant is of hybrid origins.

    This may still be correct for some botanical names, but not horticultural - though don't quote me on that, as I am not a botanist. Though the ICBN (International Code of Botanical Nomenclature) is available online, last I looked, (this is the Vienna version, from the 17th congress) and it was searchable. Apparently it is now updated by the ICN or (International Code of Nomenclature) and is a PDF, which I linked to the acronym ICN, which is a documentation of the changes to the Vienna code, making it now the Melborne code, after the 18th congress, held there.

    This usually happens when someone confuses botanical nomenclature with horticultural nomenclature, they work together, are similar, yet not the same.
    - - - - - - - - - -

    Generally, botanists discover new plants, study them, photograph, measure, draw them, describe and publish them. Collect specimens, smash them flat, dry them out, and file their dead remains in herbaria.

    Horticulturists, may do many of the earlier listed things that botanists do, but usually avoid the later things, those that come after, "Collect specimens,".
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 11-25-2014 at 10:45 PM.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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