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Thread: High priced carnivorous plants

  1. #9
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    I suspect that often among sellers it is understood that new and rare species represent a bubble that will soon pop so they get the money they can while they can. If the price is too high in a grower's mind then they can wait and it will likely come down with time. Of course plants that are hard to grow or difficult to propagate may not follow this model. I would argue that for many large-scale cp retailers this isn't where most of the money is. They do most of their business dealing with newer growers selling them more common and more easily grown species. As for the rarer/new species, sellers are causing the prices to drop all the time through increased propagation. When the market is so limited it isn't hard to saturate it. Many of the plants we now take for common and easy were once considered rare and difficult to grow.

    Having said that, I do understand the desire to have and grow that awesome new species that I keep seeing photos of online. I am guessing all of us here do. Building one's growing abilities, credibility and circle of contacts and friends in the hobby seems to me to be the way to make it happen. But if you get the chance to buy the plant and you have the ability to grow it, that works too.
    - Mark

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Citing only Nepenthes, I have to point out that the $$$ seed-grown plants available to us may have taken 5 years or more to grow to a sell-able size! Sometimes its even more than that. Tissue culturing this genus is just as costly and time consuming. I'm just saying that its unrealistic to expect a plant that too YEARS to produce would ever be sold for the same prices as Flytraps and seedling Sarracenia. Most other CPs can be had for under $20, and I don't consider that expensive at all.

    Growing Nepenthes is always going to be a rich man's game.
    Last edited by Whimgrinder; 12-10-2014 at 02:00 PM.

  3. #11

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    I second Whimgrinder's opinion.

    The time and the electricity bill it took to grow the plants sometimes justifies the price, this is not like growing grass I mind you.

    This is an expensive hobby (like many other hobbies I'm sure), so if one's not serious enough to be willing to pay for the conditions/plants, he/she should consider dropping out or sticking with the easier growing ones.

  4. #12
    pokie22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    Citing only Nepenthes, I have to point out that the $$$ seed-grown plants available to us may have taken 5 years or more to grow to a sell-able size! Sometimes its even more than that. Tissue culturing this genus is just as costly and time consuming. I'm just saying that its unrealistic to expect a plant that too YEARS to produce would ever be sold for the same prices as Flytraps and seedling Sarracenia. Most other CPs can be had for under $20, and I don't consider that expensive at all.

    Growing Nepenthes is always going to be a rich man's game.
    For the few of us who do Nepenthes tissue culture, it is not a speedy or cheap process .

  5. #13
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    I don't think there are many people that do notable research on the business/economics aspect of the carnivorous plant industry. I imagine that if you were to try and crunch those figures yourself you would be one of the few people who ever thought to try.

    The price of carnivorous plants is constantly going down, slowly but surely. The size of the market makes it such that it is very easy to change the demand and price for a type of plant even just from an individual's standpoint. The more people that join the hobby as time goes on, the more likelihood there is of people cloning, breeding, propagating and spreading the plants around and that is what slowly dwindles the price of certain plants.

    Even N. edwardsiana - for instance, has gone down in price. When I first started growing CP's it was unfathomable to consider that you could ever buy one. The rare specimen that would make it onto ebay would have gone for close to if not over 1000 dollars. Then Wistuba started selling them for just a few hundred dollars.. Now you can look on ebay and see poached specimen for a couple hundred dollars as well... My point is the plant went from priceless/unavailable to ludicrously priced and more readily available. That's a price drop in my mind.

    Heck you hear some old timers talk about when they were first trying to get their hands on a Nepenthes of any kind, it wasn't easy or cheap to get even a N. ventricosa! Now look at it, they are everywhere.

    Just keep growing, cloning, trading, giving, breeding. We are the carnivorous plant industry.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

  6. #14
    Sashoke's Avatar
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    What Paul said. The price is to justify the time and expense that was put into the plant youre receiving. I find the prices are usually reasonable.
    Last edited by Sashoke; 12-10-2014 at 03:25 PM.
    ~Burgeoning connoisseur of all things ventricosa or otherwise tubby.~

  7. #15
    ps3isawesome's Avatar
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    thanks for everyone's input, it's really insightful

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    theplantman's Avatar
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    I don't believe it's really economically feasible for any grower in North America to make a profit on Nepenthes. Land costs in CA are prohibitive, while in the rest of the country it's the heating/cooling costs. It doesn't surprise me in the least that the biggest growers are overseas in the tropics. Domestic "growers" are essentially middlemen, who resell what they buy wholesale.

    Remember, for example, the well-known Nepenthes grower last winter whose greenhouses froze? One irreversible night of error. That risk isn't present in Sri Lanka. I do wonder if there will/have been any attempts to set up a Nepenthes facility in Florida, Mexico or South America.

    For other CPs that have generally high-ish prices, there are significant horticultural hurdles that may never be overcome. For example, slow growth and long maturation times. Then specialized dormancy periods, resistance to tissue culture, etc.

    And in order to break the prices at a significant level, you have to do something on an epic scale like this. Those kinds of "factories," horrifying as I find them as a professional horticulturist who prefers the "hands-on" aspect of his discipline, are the reason the price was broken on Phalaenopsis.
    Last edited by theplantman; 12-10-2014 at 08:50 PM.

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