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Thread: Zombie Sphagnum or Algae?

  1. #9

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    Ok. So for the short term (next 6 months) this will probably be more of a visual annoyance than anything else? The Nepenthes were in good shape when i got them in, but their health quickly deteriorated. this is a known to be a tricky species, Nepenthes vieillardii. But since i put them in in thier current condition they are all recovering and growing the cutest tiny pitchers. The plants themselves are about 3cm across.

    Ill leave them in there for now, i have been tracking thier growth pretty quickly. I wonder if the algae may have come in from some spores in the 10 gallon aquarium they are in.

    I still have most of the potting mix. What is the best way to sterilize?.... im thinking maybe throw all of it in a pressure cooker for an hour or two?

    Thank you all for the replies!

  2. #10
    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    A microwave is suitable, no pressure cooker needed. Although I guess that would be kinda fun...

  3. #11
    w03's Avatar
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    One note about sterilization is that it doesn't guarantee no nasties will pop up, even in the short term. Since you've killed everything off in the media, any spores and crud that land on it can grow rampantly without competition.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
    My meager growlist

  4. #12
    NECPS Editor Radagast's Avatar
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    I buy the high quality dried LFS and I ONLY have problems with algae when I use it to pot up plant species that are meant to sit on a water tray. In my conditions (in my unheated, uninsulated, unfinished basement in zone 5 northeastern USA) the humidity is never above 70-80%, so for me it is likely most related to waterlogged conditions and inadequate drainage.

    Whenever I see algae beginning to creep up on the top layer, I use scissors and clip off the effected strands of LFS and replace it with new pieces of moistened LFS. Sure...It's like putting a bandaid on something that needs stitches but at least it improves the aesthetics.

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