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Thread: New Nepenthes edwardsiana

  1. #17

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    Maybe using the bio-dome method would work to get small plants acclimated

  2. #18
    villosaholic Heli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NemJones View Post
    Lol we still have yet to see someone who can replicate the results.
    Multiple people have replicated the results.. Nepenthes hamata is easy as hell to grow.

  3. #19
    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
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    This is how my hamata, vent. cream, and eddie grow--

    Current conditions, it'll get up to at least 80 today again:


    Yeah, that's no humidity. It hurts to breathe. I just watered the plants and left some standing water so I don't lose *all* of the pitchers, just most of them

    This is the eddie in a 4" pot:


    Its to the left of that caterpillar-eaten hamata, and the vent cream is in that same tray:

  4. #20
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    So--- Why are Edwardsiana and Hamata so incredibly expensive (generally) if they're easy to grow? Don't easy to grow plants get cheaper over time, because they are easier to reproduce?

    I'm struggling to understand how some people can grow excellent specimens on windowsills, yet elsewhere gloom and doom is proclaimed. I took from this that replicating the natural environment of these plants is the best approach. But having seen BigBella's specimen, I'm beginning to wonder.
    Sarracenia Addicted... Lover of all toothed Nepenthes.
    The right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. ~ The Second Amendment

    Keep it that way.

  5. #21
    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
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    Because people will pay that much.

  6. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by katya_dog1 View Post
    So--- Why are Edwardsiana and Hamata so incredibly expensive (generally) if they're easy to grow? Don't easy to grow plants get cheaper over time, because they are easier to reproduce?

    I'm struggling to understand how some people can grow excellent specimens on windowsills, yet elsewhere gloom and doom is proclaimed. I took from this that replicating the natural environment of these plants is the best approach.
    First, there's the standard Economics 101 explanation of simple supply in demand, for exotic plants in general; there are very few suppliers; and they are generally overseas, with less than ideal exchange rates. Second, N. edwardsiana, unlike the others, has only recently entered micropropagation -- tissue culture -- after several years of fits and starts, and by only a single supplier; and it holds a not-entirely undeserved reputation for being a slow grower, under some cultural circumstances. Also, TC can be and is generally labor-intensive; many laboratory hours are expended, changing media, transferring plants from vial to vial; and it is an expensive pursuit, both in terms of time and material, for any nursery . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  7. #23
    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by katya_dog1 View Post
    I'm struggling to understand how some people can grow excellent specimens on windowsills, yet elsewhere gloom and doom is proclaimed. I took from this that replicating the natural environment of these plants is the best approach. But having seen BigBella's specimen, I'm beginning to wonder.
    What we're seeing here is the product of highly skilled and experienced growers who know how to treat the plants so that they can flourish in conditions divergent from their natural environment. That being said, San Diego (and most Mediterranean climate-regions where people grow Neps outdoors successfully all year) still has the nightly temperature drops that people claim these plants need to survive. It's a far cry from a dark windowsill in Chicago handled by someone who reports experience only with N. fusca and N. alata.

  8. #24
    ps3isawesome's Avatar
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    It's a blessing to live in coastal Northern California. It makes growing nepenthes that much easier.

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