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Thread: Cephalotus

  1. #1
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    Well, I have had a ceph for almost a year now, for the last few months it has been in my terrarium, but it's not huge, it's been growing the same size pitchers since I got it... and I am starting to wonder if I just don't have good conditions for it...

    Any how, I was wondering if anyone with ALOT of ceph experience would mind giving us the rundown on this plants sluggish crawl to maturity. My traps are about 1.2 centimeters in heigth, the plant has 4 rosettes, which I guess I could probably divide... but I am scared to...

    I would like to know how long it is going to take this plant to become a bruser!

    OH, and the light it gets is the same as my nepenthes get, they seem happy... it's in a high humidity tank, and it's planted in peat, orchid bark mix, perlite, and long fiber sphagnum, at about five inches in depth...

    When I got it, the root structure was almost non-existent, do you think maybe it has been putting all it's energy int building nice roots? I still don't think the roots are all that hot, and it was my understanding they sent out deep tap roots... I had to move it a month ago, and the soil clup I grabbed held all the roots, and that was smaller than a tennis ball... to be fair, the plant could be wadded up tenderly and occupy the same space as a golf ball in size...

    THe plant is green, I guess it could use more light, but that is not gonna happen, I have all the light in that terrarium that I can get...

    What are it's temps like in nature? I have been thinking about using this mild winter to harden it off in my enclosed patio (humidity around 60% never drops below 60, and then trying to grow it in a relatively shaded area outdoors this summer, where the temp can get up to 102 in the afternoon (Not in shade)...

    ANy thoughts? If I do try it outdoors, I will be buying more plants from Phil and Jaie when they become available, just so I don't lose it all...

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    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    RAM,
    Cephalotus is a very slow grower. I have some plants I grew from seed 15 years ago and the pitchers are still less than 2 cm high! From cuttings it is much quicker, getting to maturity in about three years. They can take a year or two to recover from repotting so don't repotting very often. Give them a very deep pot which they will appreciate. They never have much root apart from the thick central root, and never seen to produce many fine roots at all.

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    GOE, Thanks,

    I knew they were slow growers, but I had no idea they were THAT slow! Dang! OK...

    So mine has high humidity, a 55 gallon tank with soil five inches deep to grow in, and is getting a good amoung ot light, it actually get's some real light in the corner it is in... so, I guess it is actually doing pretty good then...

    Let me give you some specs...

    The plant, including it's all of it's pitchers and multiple crowns is about 2 inches long, and an inch and a half wide, making it a roughly 2 inch long ovioid cluster of pitchers and leaves, actually almost completley pitchers...

    Again, the pitchers are about a centimeter and a half tall, but a little less in diameter than say, an old wood style number two pencil.

    how long do you think it will be before it increases substantially in size? I know it could be recieving more light, as it has zero red in it... would re-angleing the tank to give it more direct sunlight be that much more beneficial you think?

    I have kinda ignored this plant in favor of the nepenthes, and I am 'digging' it again, and want it to do well.

    I hope that someday I will have a huge one, either through growing this one up, or buying a more mature specimen than the one I have...


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    Hi Ram

    It's nice to be giving back some info for a change!

    My grandparents live in Albany (common name for these things is the Albany pitcher plant) and I've seen a few in the wild.

    If and when you repot your plant, go for a more sandy mix and skip the orchid bark. Maybe a 50/50 peat and sand mix will do fine.
    Re temps:
    The Perongerups are a set of tiny little hills that we call mountains cause we don't really have any (they are only a few hundred metres high). They are just a little ways out the back of Albany, and it sometimes snows for a VERY brief period on the tops. It gets pretty cool down Albany way in mid winter so 60F won't worry them too much, in fact they'll probably like it. Likewise in summer there are few days where it falls below 30C (sorry, don't know what that is in F) but they can take that too.

    Cheers, fatboy.

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    according to http://www.futuresource.com/weather/cfcalc.asp

    30 degrees celcius is 86 degrees farenheit..

    using that calculator, i figure the plant must be able to withstand 38.8 degree celcius summers... can it?

    Thanks by the way! [img]http://www.**********.com/iBhtml/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

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    38.8 degrees celcius! Whoa thats quite hot....ram i hope u know that cephs absolutly detest heat and it will kill them,personly i wouldn't let your ceph get too hot. In the wild these plants grow in extremly dense shrub,and i have read about peoples feild trips to ceph habitat and they say that it is impossible to even see the cephs through the undergrowth so i wouldn't suggest too much light or heat. They also said the cephs they found tend to have more leaves on them than pitchers so if it's not pitchering like mad i don't think u should worry. Um but almost about everywhere i have read about these plants says they hate heat so i thought u might just like to be aware of that. Oh and did u know that they grow larger pitchers with the less light they receive?

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    yeah, I knew about larger pitchers with less light, I also knew about the heat, but I could never find any written info on what that threshold is... So, I will not put them outside... I'll keepem indoors...

    I know they can take more light than I am currently providing, so I think perhaps in the future, sometime between now and the green house, I will build a REAL terrarium... Outfit it with not only flourescent, and metal halide... yup... I think that is what I will do... [img]http://www.**********.com/iBhtml/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

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    LOL i could never imagine growing plants under artifical light,it still hasn't really sunk in with me that you can grow plants under lights,maybe the problem is the light? Maybe you should give it sunlight and not artifical light?

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