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Thread: Martial arts

  1. #9

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    Schloaty,

    Your absolutely right... any "soft training" would definitely add to a hard style. It'll give the practicer that extra "umph".

    Depending on the lineage of the Kempo you study, it could be chinese in origin. The closer your Kempo is to it's relative chinese origin, the easier (and seamlessly) it is to incorporate chi kung into the regiment. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
    DOH!

  2. #10
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    Cchang,
    The kenpo (with an "n", not "m"...I think Kempo is Japanese, with swords or something...not sure) I study is Ed Parker's American Kenpo. I think the real origin is Chinese, but it went through Japan and Hawaii first, and there is a lot of phillipino influence....I think Ed Parker had learned Kali or Arnis too, so he put that in the system also.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  3. #11

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    Sorry about that typo... the japanese way of the sword is Kendo and if I'm not mistaken, you can use Kenpo and Kempo interchangably. I've seen both so I'm not sure what to think now. Either way sorry about the spelling, I should have picked it up in your last post. Didn't mean to offend.

    I know of Ed Parkers American Kenpo. He studied with Bruce Lee and because of that, the system is very much a mixed style. Sensei Parker (is that how you address him?) is also very well aquinted with Dan Inosanto and that's probably where the Arnis comes into play. The system is well rounded and has much to offer in terms of martial skill. The Arnis and Kali definitely fits in well with Kenpo's inherent speed. I use to dabble in Arnis/Kali and still do in the odd seminars but I've got way too much on my plate with Kung Fu itself. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
    DOH!

  4. #12

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    Sweet, I love the Martial Arts. As I have been taking it for years. I have been taking Kissaki-Kai for the past couple years. A modifation of shotokan karate. I also do Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Back in 1998 I stayed a week in LA at the Gracie Dojo - an awsome place to be. Did 30 hours of training [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img] I had burns all over. I LOVED IT!!! Nice to see some Martial Artist at PFT...I knew that schloaty took some. I was wondering what kind you were taking. Kickboxing would be nice as I have long legs.

    travis
    \"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.\"
    -- Oscar Wilde

    http://www.nasarracenia.org/

  5. #13
    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    cchang
    here is a link Long Fei
    we do quite a mix some Sun, Chang etc, a mix of hard and soft, lots of sword work. I haven't been doing this style very long so cannot elaborate. Our instructor is very good at self defence applcations which is my favourite. I have also studied Lau Gar & Wu Shu Kwan before, which are external styles.
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

  6. #14
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    Wink

    CChang, you didn't offend [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] No harm, no foul. I've never seen my style spelled with an "m" (I've been practicing for 12 years), so I tend to think Kempo is a different style. Too bad no-one here takes it so they could clarify. I'd look it up on the internet, but I'm too lazy. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]

    Travis
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    Kickboxing would be nice as I have long legs.
    [/QUOTE]
    you'd think so, right? Turns out most kickboxers punch each other a lot more than kick. Even the greats, like Bill "Superfoot" wallace mostly punched (just look out if he decides to kick&#33[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]. Within the confines of American kickboxing (no leg kicks), kicking is too tireing and too easy to defend against. VERY satisfying when you sneak on in, though! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]
    If you do Mui-tae (tai? I forget), and are allowed to kick the legs, kicking becomes much more realavent. Anyhow, enough philibuster for one post.....
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  7. #15
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    OOh, I've heard of muy-thai (spelled something like that). It's an external martial art from Thailand, with a lot of use of kicking, isn't it?

  8. #16

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    Muay Thai Kickboxing is probably the most brutal sport I've seen around next to all these mixed martial arts competition. They practically train themselves into the ground and their intensity and dedication is just unbelievable. Then again, to become a National Muay Thai Champion in Thailand is like becoming a God.

    The professional lifespan of a Muay Thai kickboxer (if you train like they do in Thailand) is 2 - 3 years max before they begin to feel the effects of their training techniques catch up to them. You're looking at long term damage to ligaments and tendons (osteoarthritis and joint pain especially when older). This is where chi kung comes in handy. By systematically developing the "iron leg", you protect yourself from these long term effects with the same end result. But then, most Muay Thai Kickboxers don't have an hour a day for 3 years to spend on chi kung.

    Of course anybody training in Muay Thai Kickboxing doesn't have to punish themselves to that level to learn to defend themselves. Maybe halfway could do?

    Schloaty is absolutely right on the kicking Travis...
    In all martial arts, there are a myriad of kicks which can be categorized by low, mid and high. 75% of the time, the most effective kicks are low (below the waistline). 20% are mid level (between waist and solar plexus). Only 5% are effective above the solar plexus. It takes too much energy to lift your leg that high and also it's too far of a distance to move, allowing your opponent to "read" you. Of course, if you can bring your opponent down first, it would make things a lot easier to kick to their head. I'm strictly talking about self defence application here. At a competitive level, I don't know of one organization that allows you to kick below the waistline.

    So why do we train high kicks? For flexibility and in case we are able to sneak one in, but you have to be really sneaky about it and the risk factor is often very great.

    I apologize for taking so much space in this forum... martial arts is my #1 passion... CP's #2. I literally, eat, breath and crap martial arts, it's not funny... but it's very satisfying.

    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    DOH!

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