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Thread: Martial arts

  1. #17

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    I think kicks are good if you know how to use them. Usually in full contact I kick to the legs to keep the opponent away. I am not much for highflying kicks - I would rather punch or take someone to the ground depending on the situation. The only kick I do not care for is the hook kick in tournaments... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img] Well that is martial arts - it is a contact sport. To know how to use kicks properly adds another aspect to your fighting skills.

    travis

    The best thing about martial arts is you can talk smack...and then be friends afterwards. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]
    \"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.\"
    -- Oscar Wilde

    http://www.nasarracenia.org/

  2. #18
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    Arrow

    Gotta agree with cchang. Those Mui Thai guys are nuts. I knew a guy (American, if you can beleive it) who was one of those mui thai guys that kicks a steel pole to deaden his shins. Yikes. The difference between him and the Tailan fighters is (usually) thailand fighter are small. This guy (Chris) is BIG. I've seen him fold a banana bag IN HALF with a thai round house.
    I take a much more moderate approach. I just spar, hit the bag, and train in technique. Toughness comes with time. I don't plan on getting in the ring, and fighting for several rounds (I can though. I sparred 6 rounds last night. ) If I have to defend myself, it won't last more than 30 seconds....if the mugger is good. Defense asside, I just like to practice...it's theraputic [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  3. #19

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    I agree schloaty and cchang people that do Mui Thai are crazy. I perfer to walk out normal than limping around [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] .

    travis
    \"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.\"
    -- Oscar Wilde

    http://www.nasarracenia.org/

  4. #20
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    I perfer to walk out normal than limping around .
    [/QUOTE]
    No kidding, Travis. After all, what's the point of learning self defense if you're always to messed up to use it?

    "Hey, Mr. Mugger, please come back next week. I need to heal before I can beat you up..."


    yeah, right.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  5. #21

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    I wonder how they walk at the age of 50? Your body is amazing but it is not good to take that kind of punishment. I do not care what people say about hardening your body - you need to listen to it and let it heal. How many instructors have bad knees and hips? Alot.

    travis
    \"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.\"
    -- Oscar Wilde

    http://www.nasarracenia.org/

  6. #22

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    Travis/Schloaty,

    Kicking a steel pole! Jeez, talk about insane.

    Any extreme training to harden parts of the body has to be done with extreme care. The practise of Hard Chi Kung protects the body as the progress is very incremental and there's medicine that you apply after each training session. My theory is that the medicine helps to heal the body faster and also draws extra calcium deposits/harden the tissues in the area you are training. This all prevents long term injury. THEN, you have those who are too impatient to pay attention to the details, who don't breath correctly, who don't strike the medium correctly, and totally rush through the exercises. These people actually degrade their health, some to point where they have virtually no energy to even function from day to day. I've seen it. It's because of this, I haven't ventured into Chi Kung until a few months ago. Needed to make sure that I was absolutely sure of what I was doing before even beginning.

    Actually, believe it or not, even regular hard training (not just extreme training) in martial arts will cause injuries. Arnis/Kali/Escrima practitioners get tennis elbow and practitioners of arts that have extensive kicking techniques experience ankle, knee and hip injuries do to the torquing motion of the kicks. To prevent these injuries, you have to make sure you warm up these joints correctly and also find ways to soften impact. Good training shoes (with extra insoles) and shock absorbing material if your sparring with weapons.

    I love hook kicks too for point sparring... gets them everytime. But I can't use it in full contact... can't get enough power out of it and it leaves me vulnerable. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]
    DOH!

  7. #23
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    there's medicine that you apply after each training session[/QUOTE]
    Are you talking about dit da jow (I spelling it phonetically, I don't really know how it's spelled)? I've actaully used it, and it works pretty well. You do heal faster.

    No power in the hook kick, eh? You're kicking the wrong targets, and relying to much on muscle. Relax through the kick. Open you hips up a mili second before snapping the kick through. You only have to move your hips about an inch to double or even triple your power (from relying solely on the hamstring). This is why spinning hooks are so much stronger. Also, instead of hooking the body, hook the quad. Boy, that hurts. Or, crease the person (bring him/her down) and hook the head.
    Did that make any sense? It's a little tough without being able to demonstrate.... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img]
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  8. #24

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    Yeah... dit da jow is one way of spelling it. The premade bottled medicine can be used for any regular injuries also... like you probably have. There's also another type of medicine that's similar which is more effective if you warm it up before you soak the injured area (not sure what it's called but I've seen it being used for Iron Palm).

    As for hook kick... I'd prefer the bring the opponent down to hook the head otherwise hook a lower target like the quads. My flexibility isn't too good... not bad... but not good either. I can kick high but the higher kicks just lack power due to inflexibility (gotta start working on them splits). This is most apparent in my hook and side kicks.

    I know what you're saying about the hips... in both kicking and punching, it makes a VERY big difference.
    DOH!

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