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Thread: Martial arts

  1. #1
    Guest
    Does anyone here take internal martial arts?

  2. #2
    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    yup, I do Long Fei Tai Chi, others previously. Also do energy healing.
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

  3. #3
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    I'd love to get into internal martial arts, but I can't seem to find the time. I was thinking about taking Aikido, wich is kind of a mix between internal and external I think. Do you use the skills you've learned for fighting?

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    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    it is very applied, lots of self defence applications, and you can use in combat.
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

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    When you say internal arts.... are you referring to martial arts in general or specific Internal Chi Kung?

    You can practice Chi Kung on it's own for health purposes (soft Chi Kung) or for martial applications (hard Chi Kung - Iron Palm, Iron Fist, Iron Body, etc.).

    Other "internal styles" in Kung Fu include all branches of Tai Chi (Sun, Yang, Chen, Wutang, etc.), Hsing-I, and Bagua Zhang (those are all I can think of at the moment). Many external Kung Fu styles include hard chi kung which supplement their specific strengths.

    Wow... I'm talking about Kung Fu on a plant forum. Go figure.

    Gardenofeden, can you explain to me the core philosophy that distinguishes Long Fei Tai Chi from the other branches? I've never encountered this branch...
    DOH!

  6. #6
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    I mainly know about ba gua and Hising-I, but I really don't know much about the many branches of martial arts. I've read about internal martial arts, and their enphasis on the use of chi. I was just wondering if anyone has experience with studying the use of chi in combat, and using chi to motivate your movements, and deliver greater power to them. I actualy hope to study ba gua someday.

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    Lightbulb

    OOOh, OOOh! martial arts subject!! I gotta get in on this!!
    I study Kickboxing (very not-internal) and Kenpo Karate. Kenpo is also a rather hard style, but internal or "soft" elements can be incorporated, depending on the practioner. Usually, though, I would consider it a hard, explosive style.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  8. #8

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    Nathaniel,

    All chinese martial arts have both an internal and external component (if the Master truly learned the system). Most of the "hard" styles of kung fu focuses on the external first before turning internal. Soft styles is opposite to that, focusing on the internal first before going external. Either way, if you fully master any style of kung fu, you will have both the internal and external (again, if the master himself has fully achieved it himself). So it depends on which side of the scale you want to begin. If you start with Bagua, then the emphasis is on internal first before external.

    As for using chi to affect movement and power, you're now talking about push hand and sticky hand exercises (not just limited to tai chi or wing chun - but also preying mantis, choi lay fut, and hung gar). These exercises teach sensitivity to your opponent's movements. The more you practise, the better you get at "predicting" an attack so that you can counter. Controlling your opponents balance also is important. As explained by a Tai Chi and Push Hands master I talked to earlier this year, think of plate mail armor. When it's erect and upright, not much can penetrate it, but once it's bent and twisted, weak points are exposed. The human body is similar that when a person is in control of their centre of gravity, the body is aligned and stable in structure. Once centre of gravity is lost, everything is out of alignment and many weak points are exposed. Any damage taken at this time is actually multiplied and more damaging than if the body was in alignment.

    I've heard of stories where masters can project their chi "outwards". In most cases, from what I've witnessed, they're usually kinetic tricks but are still effective in battle and can be very damaging (and still takes many years to master). An example of this is Iron Palm. The apparent damage seen by an Iron Palm is broken bones and muscle/ tissue damage, but actually, the force continues through and damages the internal organs. Sometimes, the result is immediately noticed... other times, it could take a couple of days.

    Charles
    DOH!

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