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Thread: Okay, what is this dormancy business

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    Ok, I have been wondering what is up with the whole concept of dormancy for CPs - I have some Newbie questions!!! (sorry!!&#33[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] firstly, do ALL CPs have a dormancy period? what actually happens to the plant during the dormancy period? does it die back or something? How do you induce dormancy and for how long? I have read something about putting VFTs in the refrigerator or such....I am not completely onboard with this whole dormancy business yet.I would sure like to hear some good basic info to prepare me for the fall and winter so I know what to expect!!!! I must admit that I hate the thought of my plants dying back and sitting in a fridge but what ever has to be done I will do!!!!

    The Evil Spider Hunter

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    apple rings.. what more can i say? FlytrapGurl's Avatar
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    Dormancy... well, most CPs need dormancy every fall-winter, with the exception of a few plants, such as the Nepenthes. I'm only experienced with dormancy with VFTs and purpreas, but I do know this: dormancy is necessary for most CPs every year, starting around the Octoberish area. I live in Florida, which, surprisingly, IS cold enough during the fall and winter(around 30* F.)to induce dormancy without putting the plants in the fridge, so I just leave them out and let them do it on their own. If you leave them outside, decrease their water(i.e., don't let the soil stay as wet as you normally would. Just keep it a little moist. Never dry)and don't feed them anything. Remember, unless the weather gets wayyyy below freezing or something, it's not too cold for them. Give them only about an hour to two hours of direct sunlight a day and lower the humidity level. Basically, dormancy is a time of ''Hibernation'' for CPs, so they will grow extremely slow, if at all. They will also form shorter, ground leaves(in the case of VFTs)called ''Fall leaves''. After about three months, around January, slowly increase the watering rate for them, and start slowly increasing their time in direct sun, and raise the humididty level. Over time(a few weeks), they will start growing regular, tall leaves(in the case of VFTs), called ''Spring leaves'' and they will start growing rapidly.


    I don't know very much about the fridge method, so, if you need to use this method, I'll let the ''Fridge Pros'' of the forum tell you about that.

    Good luck!
    FTG
    Liquid Plummer
    Warning: Do not reuse the bottle to store beverages.

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    could you list what plants you have evil spider hunter? if you have a sundew its probably spatulata, which does not need dormancy.

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    Ok Spectablis these are what plants I have :

    2 Nepenthes ventricosa

    1 Pinguicula

    2 Drosera spatulata

    2 Drosera adelae

    2 Dionea muscupula ( common and Red Dragon )

    1 Sarrecenia purpurea

    I was asking about the refrigerator method of inducing dormancy because I live in Los Angeles and even during the winter here it seldom gets below 60 degrees in the daytime and sometimes dropping to 45 or 50 degrees at night.I just wanted to know what to expect as fall and winter come around again - which they will eventually will.I appreciate all the info from you guys and gals.....

    The Evil Spider Hunter

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    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Knowing the kinds of plants you have will help. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] It depends on whether the species is tropical, sub-tropical, temperate, etc. There are many sundews that need dormancy. Sarracenia need dormancy as well but nepethes do not.

    Suzanne
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    Regarding Dormancy in CP:

    Actually most Drosera and Utricularia species, along with Nepenthes are tropical and have no dormancy issues.

    It's the North American temperate Genera that do require dormancy: Darlingtonia, Sarracenia, Dionaea, and the following Drosera: anglica, rotundifolia, intermedia, filiformis, linearis all require cold dormancy just above or just below freezing. Also D. stenopetala, arcturi, and uniflora need this, but they are quite rare.

    Some other species require a summer dormancy: tuberous sundews, South African winter growing Drosera species, pygmy Drosera, Petiolaris Complex Drosera all have a summer dormancy where they should be allowed to rest, usually under dry conditions. There are exceptions to this rule regarding the pygmys and petiolaris, but this rule generally applies.

    Naw, don't let it bother you. Dormancy is what produces the healthiest plants with the best growth. In many cases dormancy may be skipped, but in all cases the plants will prosper from it. I encourage you to experiment once you have some spare plants, and to share the results with us.



    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Quote (The Evil Spider Hunter @ June 19 2003,10:20)
    Ok Spectablis these are what plants I have :

    2 Nepenthes ventricosa

    1 Pinguicula

    2 Drosera spatulata

    2 Drosera adelae

    2 Dionea muscupula ( common and Red Dragon )

    1 Sarrecenia purpurea

    I was asking about the refrigerator method of inducing dormancy because I live in Los Angeles and even during the winter here it seldom gets below 60 degrees in the daytime and sometimes dropping to 45 or 50 degrees at night.I just wanted to know what to expect as fall and winter come around again - which they will eventually will.I appreciate all the info from you guys and gals.....

    The Evil Spider Hunter[/QUOTE]
    Nepenthes ventricosa doesn't need dormancy [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    Pinguicula, some species have a dry, warm winter dormancy and some a cold, damp (maybe not damp...) winter dormancy. You probably have Pinguicula primuliflora or morensis, and they don't need dormancy. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    Drosera spatulata doesn't need dormancy [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    Drosera adelae doesn't need dormancy [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    Dionaea Muscipula needs dormancy [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img]
    Sarracenia purpurea needs dormancy [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img]

    For dormancy, read this topic:
    http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....19;st=0

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