User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 41

Thread: Peat Free composts for Sarracenia

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    988
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    just a guess but what is someone used only pine needles? There acidic when they decompsoe

  2. #10
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Alexandria Bay, NY Z-5a
    Posts
    6,341
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hmm.....good point Ceph. .......................Hmm.......I have seen Purpurea's up by my well known bogs growing in densely packed areas under tall pines. I may look into that. AND IF we COULD get them to root and grow well in it then we could get more pressure off of peat supplies and pines aren't endangered! :cheesy:

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Marshfield, MA (US) USDA zone 6 cold-temperate coastal
    Posts
    454
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Great idea--let's compare pine needles to Sphagnum:

    coarse needles that haven't been off a tree for very long would be a little similar to long-fiber sphagnum, i.e well draining but not suitable for things like VFTs and small sundews.

    I doubt dead pine needles would hold nearly as much water as peat, however

    a rule of composting pine needles is: wait till they are well-decomposed before using them in your garden because needles right off a tree will damage plants, visible as a burning of the leaves--therefore, plain undecomposed needles may not work for cp

    but if you let the needles *rot* for several months till they're a fine humus (similar to leaf mould?) they just might work as at least a partial substitute for Sphagnum peat

    keep in mind that most cp in the wild don't get smothered with pine needles--they are far more suited to growing in peat

    and growers would need to experiment to find out how quickly the needles decompose into a deadly, anaerobic mush similar to cereal left out for too long

    But pine needles are worth a try!
    Chris

  4. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    543
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Guys,
    That has given me food for thought. There is a potential threat to peat supplies in the UK within the next few years and I will try some experiments with some peat free composts. I like the the idea of pine needles, decomposed ones, because in forestry land in the UK where you have streams running through, you will often see Sphagnum growing naturally in places.
    Acidic sand is not a problem to get hold of either, it is sold as silver sand here and I use it with my VFT without problems mixing it with peat at the moment.
    With the Sarracenias, I use 3 parts moss peat to 1 of perlite at the moment so now I think for me is to do some trials! Thanks again for you input, plus any further ideas are most welcome!

  5. #13
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas; USA
    Posts
    2,363
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    well.. just a thought if it doesn't work out... start a canadian peat import biz... [img]http://www.**********.com/iBhtml/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    jk

    pine needles seems to me like it would be ideal

    another thought, is here any how, when christmas is over, a big truck comes around and picks up all the old christmas trees, they take them to a special landfill (only trees and brush) and then chip them up into piles. You come by, pay a 5 buck entry fee, and you can take as much as you can haul, and come back as many times in a day as you want.

    Texans are very big on getting this stuff, because our soil is so alkaline, you HAVE to do it in order to have any success groing stuff in the ground.

  6. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Western Oregon USA
    Posts
    119
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How about using a sand, pumice mix with orchid bark to add acidity, the pumice would keep it from getting too dense, making the mix more open. Perhaps 25% sand, 25% Orchid bark and 50% pumice. The orchid bark also would not break down as quickly as pine needles. You could use pearlite instead of pumice if it is easier to get. The only problem with this mix, indeed any largly non organic mix, would be that it will not hold water for long (in comparison to peat) and so would need to be watered frequently. M2CW.

  7. #15
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas; USA
    Posts
    2,363
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    could rock wool be a good substitute for peat? in green crunches mix I mean...

  8. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Western Oregon USA
    Posts
    119
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rock wool might work. I am not real familiar with it but you could try putting a 6" block of it in a half inch of water for a while, if the top of the block is wet then it has enough wicking strength to keep most CPs going in a tray watering system. I suppose you could break it up some and use it to replace the pumice and part of the sand in the mix I suggested, it would be worth a shot.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •