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Thread: Peat Free composts for Sarracenia

  1. #17

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    What about hydroponics?

  2. #18

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    Sounds like a good mix. You could also substitute the pumice with lava rock.

    I think the the main hurdle would be keeping the mix moist enough. We're used to peat mixes that hold water for LONG time, and this mix would take some experimentation, and modification if necessary.

  3. #19

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    Hydroponics! Awesome idea! Hydroponics can be kept very wet and rarely need refreshing. However, I've never done hydroculture, so I can't really speculate.

    Anyone here done hydroponics? If so, what do you think about growing sarrs that way?
    Chris

  4. #20

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    I don't know much about it either, but I do know this: Carnivorous plants are some of the least soil nutrient-dependent plants in the world, so one would think that their roots would need little more than just pure water. I'm not sure of this, however, but even if they need something else from the soil, I would think that the right fertilizer added to the water in minute amounts would take care of that need. More research would be needed, but I would think that somebody out there would have thought of this before me. It seems so obvious it's almost silly! [img]http://www.**********.com/iBhtml/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

  5. #21

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    My understanding of hydroponics is to have a nutrient rich solution flowing through an inert media that the plants are rooted in, now with CPs they take in very little to no nutrients through their roots and peat and sand are pretty much inert so a tray system would qualify as a primitive hydroponic system!
    The soil mix that I suggested and RP modified could have the last organic ingredient removed if another suitable, non organic, source of acidity could be provided without leaving residual salts in the soil upon evaporation. Any suggestions?

  6. #22

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    Oh yeah, I forgot about acidity... I suppose you could put some sort of acid in the water, I don't know if any straight chemical would be suitable for CPs, but you could probably just soak something acidic in the water, such as pine needles. Anyone have any ideas as to what to use to make the water acidic? Preferrably something inorganic. Then you could just use straight water without any soil at all. Would this work?

  7. #23

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    All I can think of besides some sort of peat tea (which defeats the point of using hydroculture) would be aluminum sulfate, which is a chemical and would eventually cause mineral buildup.

    I know it DOES work because I sometimes use it on my cp, but it's inorganic.

    Maybe, as you said, pine needle infused water?
    Chris

  8. #24

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    I think Acetic acid (vinegar) might work but I will have to check out the evaporation rate to see if it would accumulate, it is suposed to evaporate completely in time so it should not build up too bad and for a pH of 6 it should be dilute enough not to smell too bad, especialy if you just used it as an occasional rinse to keep the pH down. Please DON'T go off and pickle your plants on this advise though, I still need to check out a lot of stuff first, evaporation, dilution, etc. etc.etc. If any one has tried this in the past, what happened? Would love to hear.

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