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Thread: Carnivory...what IS it?

  1. #25
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Hi Chris [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    Thanks for the info...makes sense. I still see insectivorous used but more often its carnivorous.

    And dinosaurs are fascinating. Its too bad we can't ever REALLY know that much...only theories. But it sure is interesting every time new fossils are discovered.

    S
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    Oooh... Is the water cold now? I'm LATE I say, LATE!

    My view... Roridula with its bugs... If you call purp and heliamphora carnivores, then you MAY not say that Roridula is not... All these plants have their own little buddies to do the digestion part of it first, the plants then, absorb the softer material (kind of like when you feed old people mush... The assisin bug and the bacteria are the blender)... Old people are still watever-they-happen-to-liquify-ivorous... Right?

    Guinea pigs do the Kaka thing too... Why don't Pandas It would indeed be an adventageous adaptation...

  3. #27

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    Also, Greg, there is that regurgitating birds comparison...

    BUT,
    Quote
    kind of like when you feed old people mush[/QUOTE]

    Trouble with this comparison is that um, er, the caregiver *doesn't* consume and then defecate the mush as a material more easily absorbed. lol had to point that out

    And the kaka thing...yeah, I've seen hamsters do that too. Weird! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    Chris
    Chris Roy
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  4. #28
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Ram,

    I don't know that I classify Rex as an uber predator so much as I think it was just a giant land-walking gator. He hunted things both big and small but was more than happy to eat something dead if he came across it too.

    Quote
    so here's the catch... you say his teeth aren't designed to crush bone... I can buy that, however, there is the fact that tests have shown the roots of his teeth were to shallow to survive the shearing force of ripping a hunk of meet out, he would literraly, pull his own teeth while taking a huge bite out of his prey...[/QUOTE]

    I know these tests and the problem with them (as with many scientific tests) is that they were preformed by people looking for a specific result and were designed to find the result they were looking for to the exclusion of any other result. Their test was the "Take a steak knife, slam it into a 2x4 and pull straight back" method and in this method they, and you, are correct that Rex's teeth could not take the strain, the catch 22 is that NO animal teeth can take that strain. Here is the Rex predator theory: take a pair of cookie cutters, one slightly smaller then the other, and overlap them similar to out teeth. Attach these to a compress and put the 2x4 between them. Now "bite" and what you get it a chunk of 2x4 (or flesh if you are a Rex.)


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    I still believe he is capable of eating carrion without the 'bone crushing' ability... after all, when's the last time you saw a vulture crush bones? many modern carrion eaters simply pick the bones clean, or swallow the bones along with everything else... and t-rex certainly has the gullet to handle that...[/QUOTE]

    Vultures don't eat the bones, they stick their teeny tiny little heads into all the nooks and crannies and pick the loose stuff free. Rex had a big 'ol head, not good for getting into nooks and crannies.

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    "Well, we weren't there, so we can't really know for sure." which tends to take the air out of everyones arguments![/QUOTE]

    You are correct. But doesn't that same statement take the air out of your arguments too? So now we are all without air and living in a vacuum. <GASP> "Can't breath <GASP> [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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  5. #29
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    Exactly!

    I make these 'arguments' with a grain of salt, because when you really get down to it, there is no way of knowing without truly examining the animal, living and breathing.

    Nooks and crannies, by the way, on a brontosaurus, are significantly larger than most organisms nooks and crannies... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    I wouldn't be suprised if the T-Rex even had adaptations we don't know about, like a tounge with bone teeth in it (many fish have this) for grinding, and they could have been so small every expedition to date had missed them... or perhaps a gizzard of some sort...

    there are all types of things we don't know...

    Many of you know that I am a creationist, and my father has pretty much decided to live his years in retirement for the betterment of that science...

    He has a book with several texts in it that date way back to the roman occupation of england which account three types of creatures natives of the islands claim to have seen.

    1) a small lizard like bird, with the 'eye markings of a moth' on it's wings, it lived in trees like flocks of birds.

    2) a creature that lived in the forest and shot acid from it's mouth that could eat through hard leather armor (possible the origin of the Britannic Dragon?)

    3) And this one I think is cool... apparently a large lizard, with a head the size of a wagon 'stormed' a village, it was said to stand upright with a tail extended behind it, and posess terrible snapping jaws. It's hands are noted to be so tiny that they are useless... (sounds like a T-Rex like predator (of which there were MANY different types).

    Any how, I am not offering this as evidence in any way shape of form that dino's and man walked the earth together, I just thought it was interesting, especially a descritpion of a T-Rex type creature hundreds of years before their discovery.

    Any how... it's just a novelty post... don't anyone get all twisted up over this.
    \"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: \"Mankind\". Basically, it\'s made up of two separate words - \"mank\" and \"ind\". What do these words mean ? It\'s a mystery, and that\'s why so is mankind.\" ~ Jack Handey

  6. #30

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    My view on the T-Rex is that there are a few groups of people that study the T-Rex to its fullest and have their own view on what the T-Rex was (opportunist, predator, or scavenger, etc, etc...) and are looking for anything, ANYTHING to prove their theory right, and I whiling to leave out facts that disprove it. I just like to read the conflicting stories and learn more about the subject. I do not believe everything I read and I do not take anything to heart. I am not going to say that I KNOW that T-Rex is a predator because the fact is I really don't know and I cant really prove that he is. All I can say is he is ONE of the biggest meat consuming, bipedal, dinosaurs and has nothing to do with carnivorous plants beside a good example and an interesting argument.

    P.S. Good luck in growing CP's and raising a T-Rex, LOL.

  7. #31
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Virus,

    I think we can all argee with you on your description of T-rex. And in the end we won't know until I get done with my time machine [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]

    Ram,

    I hope you don't think I was getting in a twist over this. I was just having fun arguing one of the dino things that I like to have fun arguing (if you really want to get me going let's talk about the giant meteor that DID NOT kill the dinos.)

    I like the idea of bone teeth in the tounge and those are definitly something that could be missed, after all, they only just found out that Apatosaurus (Brontosaurus) had a second set of "ribs" in its belly as armor and they are starting to find all kinds of feather now that they know to look.

    As for the interesting animals, I can only comment that the second one sounds very much like the mytho-beast known as the basalisk.

    Pyro
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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  8. #32

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    A basilisk was a dragon that had the head of a chicken and the body of a snake that was so ugly that you would die or turn to stone if you looked at it depending on who you asked. There is also a real lizard called a basilisk that has the ability to run on water.
    The first creature to me unless they are suggesting pterosaurs seems to remind me of a Kuehneosaurus.
    I love these arguments because it is not everyday I get to have an intelligent discussion about two of my passions.

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