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Thread: To stratisfy or not to stratisfy...?

  1. #1

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    If stratisfication is the simulation of seasonal passing, why would you stratisfy seeds if you are growing them indoors (assuming all conditions are constant)?

    Why not just soak them in water and then plant them directly?

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    DOH!

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    I think that there are some chemicals in certain types of seeds (Sarracenia for example) that stop the seeds from germinating. These chemicals can only be destroyed by a cold spell lasting several weeks. After these chemicals are destroyed, the seeds can germinate!

    That's why they need stratification... I think...!

    SF [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rolleyes.gif[/img]

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    Think of it like this...The seeds have evolved not to sprout untill after a cold spell. This ensures they sprout AFTER winter and not before winter then die from the cold.

    If I had to have a rule of thumb, I'd say plants native to areas where it never freezes do not need cold stratification, and those where it freezes do (or at least won't hurt it if you do).

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    Quote
    The seeds have evolved [/QUOTE]

    ...or were created by God's divine intelligence... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

    SF

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    But... you could keep them in the fridge (as a mild winter simulation) and when you're ready to plant the seeds, just soak them in water (so that they saturate with water) could you not?

    I'm wondering if it's been proven that plants that have been stratisfied grow "better" than plants that haven't been stratisfied...

    Any thoughts? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rolleyes.gif[/img]
    DOH!

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    I am also wondering if it matters where the plants come from. In some climates there is no cold season so it only makes sense that the seeds of the plants that normally grow in such a climate do not need to be chilled. I sowed D. Intermedia "Cuba" seeds directly from the plant and they sprouted in less than two weeks. The ones I put in the refrig. did not sprout for months. This is not proof, but one incident.
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

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    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    Quote (cchang @ Oct. 06 2003,07:05)
    If stratisfication is the simulation of seasonal passing, why would you stratisfy seeds if you are growing them indoors (assuming all conditions are constant)?

    Why not just soak them in water and then plant them directly?

    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img][/QUOTE]
    Because seeds that need stratification are expecting the seasonal change. Plants like Sars that grow in the colder areas of the world are designed with seeds that have a special coating on them that inhibits germination untill specific conditions have been achieved (colder, shorter days with rain and/or snowfall followed by lengthening photoperiod and warmer temps) Stratification is basically fooling the seeds into thinking these conditions have been met. Wrapping them in a moist paper towel (in a ziplock bag) and putting them in the fridge for several weeks simulates a winterlike condition. After that you can pot them and keep them under growlights and the seeds will act as though it is spring and should germinate.
    As with everything else in nature there is no such thing as "always" or "never". There will be exceptions to every rule, and I'm sure there are growers out there who have had success bypassing stratification. However the general accepted "rule of thumb" is at least 4-6 weeks of stratification. If you have some extra seeds, why not experiment some? Plant a few straight from the pack, and stratify a few and see what works better. What works for one grower may not necessarily work for another.

    Good luck
    Steve
    There are only 2 infinite things... the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not too sure about the universe.

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    Thanks everybody for the feedback... I think I'll experiment and with my seeds and see which works better for me.

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    DOH!

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